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Messages - Dan-Borno

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1
General Board / Re: Endangered Species of Names!
« on: June 11, 2018, 05:26:23 AM »
Prof replies to his emails very well. If Webmaster will assist you with his email, you might reach him easier.

A Sha ruwa lafiya

2
Special thanks goes to our amiable Webmaster, Malam Salisu DanYaro, your passion to always do something for the promotion of your people has always been our strength. May Allah keep opening more doors for you.

@Gogannaka

http://www.yerwaexpress.news/news/yen5/index.php/news/540-social-media-platform-persuaded-to-take-a-new-step-go-humanitarian-by-a-comment


Social media platforms almost wholly serve, or are used for social purposes with mostly ‘entertainment undertones’. But this time, one of these platforms was in the news for a different reason—a relatively rare one.

Kano Online Forum, a social media discussion group, was persuaded by (a) comment(s) from its member(s) to trace a new path in its usage of internet-based platforms.

Kano Online, well before the entrenchment of bigtechs like Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, has been a popular online hub in Nigeria for robust intellectual engagements—going back to over a decade and half. Several articles and papers were published on its website, www.kanoonline.com.

This time, the group went ‘humanitarian’—and it was all inspired by a comment on its Whatsapp group—a comment calling on members to help internally displaced persons (IDPs) in the war-ravaged North East (Nigeria).

Members complied—and eighty (80) households among the IDPs, drawn from host communities and orphanages in Maiduguri on Wednesday took home food and housekeep items.

According to a member of the forum who spoke to YERWA EXPRESS NEWS, and who was entrusted with the responsibility to do the distribution, Barr. Mustapha Ali Busuguma, ‘it all started with a chat’!
He said the forum is supposed to be an internet-based social group, but it nonetheless saw the need, following suggestions, to help the needy especially during the fasting period.

A total of 40 bags of rice (25kg), soaps, detergents, Vaseline and Maggie cubes, among other things, were mobilized since the comments and subsequently distributed.

Mr. Busuguma said the intervention, though little, is a clear example of good use of social media platforms, emphasizing that ‘everything was motivated by a single, genuine chat; and we did it’!

He called on other social groups to take cue.

The beneficiaries who said they do not use social media and hardly know what it is, added that they are ‘nonetheless, grateful’.

3
http://www.yerwaexpress.news/news/yen5/index.php/news/540-social-media-platform-persuaded-to-take-a-new-step-go-humanitarian-by-a-comment


Social media platforms almost wholly serve, or are used for social purposes with mostly ‘entertainment undertones’. But this time, one of these platforms was in the news for a different reason—a relatively rare one.

Kano Online Forum, a social media discussion group, was persuaded by (a) comment(s) from its member(s) to trace a new path in its usage of internet-based platforms.

Kano Online, well before the entrenchment of bigtechs like Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, has been a popular online hub in Nigeria for robust intellectual engagements—going back to over a decade and half. Several articles and papers were published on its website, www.kanoonline.com.

This time, the group went ‘humanitarian’—and it was all inspired by a comment on its Whatsapp group—a comment calling on members to help internally displaced persons (IDPs) in the war-ravaged North East (Nigeria).

Members complied—and eighty (80) households among the IDPs, drawn from host communities and orphanages in Maiduguri on Wednesday took home food and housekeep items.

According to a member of the forum who spoke to YERWA EXPRESS NEWS, and who was entrusted with the responsibility to do the distribution, Barr. Mustapha Ali Busuguma, ‘it all started with a chat’!
He said the forum is supposed to be an internet-based social group, but it nonetheless saw the need, following suggestions, to help the needy especially during the fasting period.

A total of 40 bags of rice (25kg), soaps, detergents, Vaseline and Maggie cubes, among other things, were mobilized since the comments and subsequently distributed.

Mr. Busuguma said the intervention, though little, is a clear example of good use of social media platforms, emphasizing that ‘everything was motivated by a single, genuine chat; and we did it’!

He called on other social groups to take cue.

The beneficiaries who said they do not use social media and hardly know what it is, added that they are ‘nonetheless, grateful’.

4
General Board / Re: EARLY MARRIAGE? - By Dr. Zainab Shinkafi-Bagudu
« on: July 24, 2013, 02:59:48 PM »
Thats the good thing about the internet, you have access to different opinions.  I like what this lady wrote and it makes sense

5
General Board / Re-Introducing "Traditional Court Systems" in Nigeria
« on: November 06, 2012, 03:48:41 PM »
My attention is drawn to the pronouncement by the President of
South Africa, Jacob Zuma, at first I thought its the Mugabe's way
then I realised that despite the existence of the white man's court
system in Nigeria, our people are yet to understand how it works
and so many innocent people are jailed or found guilty simply
because of "technicalities".

I will agree with you if you say the traditional court system is full
of injustice and you will have to agree with me either that the
present "English System" is full of injustice either - thats why
there is the need to revive, re-write and refine our traditional form
of court system throwing away the dirty side which gives the Qadis
too much power to be abused.

In those days, bulama's within an identified community resolved
issues amicably, it is the absence of these reforms that is now engulfing
the north by fire.

You can check the full story of the Jacob Zuma traditional courts system
here http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/africaandindianocean/southafrica/9653920/Jacob-Zuma-backs-traditional-courts-instead-of-white-mans-way.html

6
To be fair to this young gentleman, as he once said in
an interactive interview while answering a similar question
but in a much criticize way said he never expected that
insecurity will top his priority if he becomes the president
of this country. 

In a nutshell, it is not easy to attain full development with
insecurity situation at hand, however, His Excellency, the
President of the Federal Republic of Nigeria, Dr. Goodluck
Jonathan Azikiwe has succeeded in liberalizing the entire
system of governance in Nigeria unlike his predecessor
(Obasanjo and Yaradua) who militarised the entire
democratic system of Nigeria.

He has also approved funds for the completion of the abandoned
dual carriage way from Kano to Maiduguri and has insisted on the
Minister in-charge to put pressure on the contractors to complete
the contract.

7
chit-chat / Re: Cigiya 'yan uwa
« on: November 05, 2012, 06:09:11 AM »
Ni dai ganinan, saura kuma su Auntyn Muhsin

8
General Board / The Thieves They Couldn’t Arrest
« on: November 04, 2012, 06:10:12 PM »
Long time no saw....common English you don't spoke lol this is grammer.

Hi friends, its been long, I read this article on the Leadership newspaper
online edition, its content is hotter than the heading and is highly recommended
to my old friends to read and digest.  The writer has identified so many problems
and proffer solutions.  A huta gajiya.


Whenever it’s time to debate the annual budget, some foreigners come in handy with their prescriptions. Lynda Chalker, former British minister for overseas development, used to be one of the frequent guests during the military era. In recent years, however, only a few foreigners have bothered to intervene, probably because they’ve discovered that budgets are not taken seriously in Nigeria.

Not even governors and presidents believe in the annual ritual. So, the IMF’s resident representative in Nigeria, Scott Rogers, was simply wasting his time on Thursday when he was advising us to avoid excessive spending and save more. He opposed raising the crude oil benchmark price – a source of orchestrated friction between the executive and the legislature.

Mr Rogers obviously means well. But he is ignorant of how the economy works here and the nature of people who run Nigeria.

I’ve not bothered to look at the 2013 “budget” because I know it’s all politics. No budget has been implemented here since 1960.

What has changed a little is the manner of sharing the nation’s wealth. I can’t be fooled by those quarrelling over the implementation level of the 2012 budget or whether the benchmark price for a barrel of crude oil (which contributes 90 per cent of government’s revenue) should be $75 or $80. As far as I know, N4.9trillion or whatever will be spent next year is what will be shared among thieves and civil servants that receive salaries and award contracts to themselves.

The lot for educating Rogers and co on how our economy is run fell on Nuhu Ribadu on Friday. While submitting the report of the Petroleum Revenue Special Task Force that he headed to President Jonathan, Ribadu repeated the words in a campaign ad being run on radio and TV by government itself: “Nigeria is the only country in the world where people steal crude oil.”

In the government’s advertorial, the narrator (a child) continues: “More than $7bilion is stolen annually in Nigeria. My dad said it’s a whole lot of money.” And on Friday Ribadu added: “Mr President, increasing crude oil theft is a national tragedy and of grave consequence, and there is need for urgent government action.”

The Ribadu report, which I’ve not read and won’t bother to read, must have ended up telling us what we already know. A highlight, I’m told, is the “discovery” that at least N16trillion has been stolen by oil thieves in the past decade. So much for oil theft. The question  to ask is why the thieves have remained untouchable over the years. Answer: all thieves are above Nigerian law. It reminds me of the title of a book I read in secondary school, which is also the title of a 1931 British film: “The Man They Couldn’t Arrest”.

We have all read about Halliburton, Siemens and scores of other scandals unveiled by one panel after another. And when I heard there was a split in the Ribadu-led task force, I remembered one of the revelations made in WikiLeaks: oil companies always have their way in Nigeria because they know the right buttons to press and how to sabotage government programmes using Nigerians.

Someone rightly christened President Jonathan’s administration “government by committees”.  While receiving each committee’s report, he would threaten fire and brimstone (as he did on Friday) but nothing would happen. His table is now full of heaps of reports that might never be implemented. Already, Nigeria is a failed state. That’s why there is complete lawlessness – and impunity.

A few years ago, a minister I know awarded a N150million contract to his girlfriend in Abuja for a job that one could complete with N5million. A current minister measures his achievements by the number of houses he has demolished, not the ones he has built.

Ours is a nation – does it even qualify as a nation? – ravaged by all manner of thieves. And the thieves have become so sophisticated and strong that  they could seize power at any level anytime. Since 1999, a few of them have emerged as governors, senators, ministers, godfathers and big-time contractors while others have handed over to their children.

Things can’t work in a country where crime is not punished. In spite of all that’s going on, no Nigerian thief – except a chicken or goat thief – is in jail today. James Ibori was unfortunate because he was caught abroad and jailed in London. Hundreds of fuel subsidy thieves and bank wreckers have been identified, but none of them has lost his freedom. Instead, they keep buying private jets.

A recent report puts Nigeria second on the list of countries with the highest number of private jets: there are over 250 of them here and each costs N5-10billion. Yet, this is Nigeria where more than 90 per cent of the citizens are poor – many are unable to eat once in two days, many can’t go to school, most are unemployed. I wonder why someone would sit comfortably as president, governor or minister in a place full of such social injustice. Does any of them desire to leave a legacy? Is accumulation of illicit wealth the only motivation for being in power or office?

I still believe that money doesn’t solve many human problems. Hospitals in India, Egypt, Dubai, South Africa and Ghana are brimming with Nigerian patients, just as schools in Europe, America and now Asia are thriving with Nigerian students. Rather than fix the education system, the thieves prefer to take the money abroad and pay school fees.

The amount of money Nigerians have spent on generators made in nations like China, South Korea and India could stabilise power supply in the country. Security vote now consumes more than N1.5trillion each year, yet the situation keeps worsening. Who is making us insecure so that security votes would be taking so much?

Every day, those who claim to be experts in government create the conditions that will ultimately sink Nigeria. There is no original thinker in any government I’ve seen in this country. Or why would our schools turn out 700, 000 youngsters each year while job creators are vanishing? Worse, our schools (public and private) are simply producing unemployable people without skills, not even the ability to read and write.

The number of JAMB exam candidates next year may hit two million; available tertiary institutions (useless as they are) cannot accommodate 15 per cent of them. Yet, somebody sits comfortably as president, education minister or national planning minister without losing sleep. Wife of Oyo State governor Florence Ajimobi gleefully announced last week that she was not arrested by the London police for money laundering.

“I only travelled last Sunday to London to accompany my child who returned to a secondary school there,” she said. “I went on an official visit to Taiwan with my husband and we did not go to London from Lagos as reported. We went to Dubai, Hong Kong, Taipei and back to Lagos.” If I may ask Mrs Ajimobi, how many British children are in Nigerian schools? When last did a governor’s wife from the UAE or China come on an “official” visit to Ibadan?

The nation’s security is also undermined in this way: the few jobs available in government institutions like the Police, Immigration, Civil Defence, FRSC and some ministries now go to either those with godfathers (legislators, governors, directors, etc) or who can pay N300-500, 000 bribe to a syndicate.

Little wonder many policemen are not dedicated to duty! They have to get the bribe money back before listening to any appeal for patriotism. Hungry and ill-equipped, they can’t confront robbers. Our hospitals have become glorified mortuaries because everything has been stolen and medical workers also want to “make it”. Luckily for them, government officials and rich thieves have their hospitals abroad.

Would things continue like this for the next 10 years? My guess is that, by 2020, this country won’t be habitable for any sane person. The rich would live abroad and visit Nigeria only occasionally to plunder its resources. The poor would be left behind to kill one another. I’ve said it before: money doesn’t solve many problems.


http://www.leadership.ng/nga/columns/39127/2012/11/03/thieves_they_couldnt_arrest.html


9
General Board / Re: GROWING RATE OF DIVORCE IN KANO
« on: March 13, 2012, 06:48:17 PM »
who told you she is coming to my house? its a dry marriage

10
General Board / Re: Muhsin Publishes First novel
« on: March 13, 2012, 06:45:46 PM »
I, on behalf of my family and good friends
do hereby launch 1 copy of the above
novel at the sum of N20,000.00

11
General Board / Re: Bomblasts in Kano and not an utter on Kanoonline
« on: January 30, 2012, 08:15:04 PM »
@ All friends, I am very sure, its the nature of the website, too colonial for a SNS.

When Boko Haram bombarded Borno in 2009, a whole thread was created and many
have contributed towards understanding what BH is all about.  As at that time, ALL
are seeing the issue as only a feud between the then Borno State Governor (SAS)
and the BH Members, so, ALL mind only their business forgeting the hausa adage
which says, in gemun dan uwanka ya kama da wuta, kaima ka shafa wa naka ruwa.
Not even Yobe State dared to commiserate with the people of Borno not to talk of
proffering solution to the problem despite the fact that the problem started from
Yobe State (Machine, Kanamma).

Its good to be keeping record, and for the record, I hereby reincarnate some of the
posts made by our friends.


one thing that is now baffling me is that, those who saw them as
at the time of the action, they said they number up to 6000, however
note more than 500 was killed including their leaders, where are the
rest of at least 5000?


Now, anya wadannan mutanen basu da hannu a kisan Sheik Ja'afar da kuma rikicin Panshekara a Kano?

BKGZ, ai we discussed somewhere in this forum the possibility of the group being behind the murder of Sheikh Ja'afar.
It wasn't long after his death that they unleashed themselves in panshekara.

DB raised a question that if only 300 out of thousands were killed then where are the remaining? That is exactly the question i asked when they attacked Kano in 2007.The army claimed to have arrested just 3 of them while reports say that they were in the hundreds.
Wai what was their plan ne? To incapacitate the police and army and then enforce the sharia themselves?
Or was it to overthrow the government?

It is unfortunate and i can understand how residents of the cities would feel.
Allah ya kare mu.
 

Ni dai yanzu, I have no doubt what so ever 100% sure wa'yannan su suka kashe Sheikh Ja'afar. Kuma the most amazing thing is that tunda an san da wa'yannan sect din and alaqar su da Sheikh Ja'afar before, it is a great wonder that the Police and SSS and the all the other intelligent services never put two and two together over the matter to arrive at the same conclusion from the glaring evidence. Yes sune suka kai harin fanshekara sometime back, around the same time they murdered Sheikh Ja'afar.
A kwai ayah a suratul Hajj in da Allah SWT Yake fada cewa


It will also be interesting to know who their financial backers and supporters are…

It is also commendable that the news and media outlets have referred to this group with the name “Boko Haram / Yusufiyya” instead of the usual stereotypical names usually and wrongly referred to these kind of groups in the past, and actually started to use when the first incidences started.

By the way, how many other sects/ fringe groups have military wing?


Assalamu alaikum,

Your account was very touchy, DB. I nearly wept. :'(

The end result always befalls the downtrodden.

May Allah, the Exalted, grant those died innocently an eternal peace, amen.

May Allah, the exalted, prevent re-occurrence of such a thing, amen.



12
chit-chat / Re: On The Couch
« on: December 15, 2011, 09:53:32 PM »
Conan the barbarian

13
General Board / Re: Kanoonline's new look
« on: December 15, 2011, 09:48:17 PM »
The site is working faster than before, I am missing my alma mater.

14
General Board / Re: GROWING RATE OF DIVORCE IN KANO
« on: November 18, 2011, 04:54:47 PM »
what of abuja ?

I thought Zawarawan Abuja are mostly millionnaires? that of Kano are
left with nothing, the economic consequences is gravier.

15
General Board / Re: Fuel Subsidy removal
« on: October 14, 2011, 04:24:00 PM »
God!!! i was at the village yesterday and this issue came up while I
was speaking with a friend on the phone.  After the conversation was
over, my uncle queried if mtn is awarding me free credits to spent on
useless talks, he said, here in the village, the first thing we learnt is
"flashing" and with as little as N50.00 we will continue flashing you guys
in the city, we cant afford to recharge. 

He was so curious to know what we are discussing on the phone and I
told him that the Government is trying to remove subsidy on petroleum
products as from next year.  It took me 20 minutes to explain to him
what subsidy is and how it is going to affect the economy and the reasons
advanced by Government to remove it.  At last, he asked me what i
brought to him from the city, after all, whether subsidy or no subsidy, we
have been living in this village for donkey years without any progress. 
He clearly mentioned that  it is us that leaves in the city benefit from oil
revenue - period.

Dan-Borno's take on oil subsidy
Reference to my village uncle's comment above, this is only a grand style
by the ecorrupt elites to further continue siphoning our public money to their
pockets.  If the federal, state and local government cannot manage the little
funds at their disposal, how about when the big fat cow is so fat that it cannot
even move a step?

This is all bull-shit, the life of the average daily life of a Nigerian is determined
by the local price of petroleum.  If a litre is sold for N200.00 today, I bet you
transportation from Maiduguri - Lagos will go up from N5,500.00 to only God
knows how much.  The pickup van i sent to the village to do kabu-kabu from
Ngetra to Gubio Central will have to be reviewed seriously, i dont know if the
villagers can even afford  it, which means coming to the weekly market will be
impossible for most of the villagers thereby affecting the sale of beans, groundnut
goat etc which the villagers heavily rely for their daily income.

Yes, it is practiced in most developed countries, but is Nigeria developed enough
to practice it?

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