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Topics - Fateez

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1
Literature / Does anybody read Hausa books?
« on: July 12, 2009, 07:06:40 PM »


I'm not talking about Magana Jari ce or Ilya dan Maikarfi. But those small 50 - 100 Naira books you find with the picture

of a woman in front (usually tayi tagumi kamar abun duniya ya ishe ta) also known as Littitaffan soyayya (Hehe!)

I recently discovered that we have amazing literary talent in the North. (Even though in Kano they face one mighty big

 obstacle --> RIDICULOUS CENSORSHIP!) Still, they make me proud by delivering some really good material. I love

how they tackle very important social problems like divorce, domestic violence, rape, teenage marriages and adultery.

But that doesn't make it gloomy though, in fact, they make very good Chick lit.

It all started some years ago when my cousin bought me some really nice books as a present and I fell in love with them

instantly. I haven't read very many so I opened this thread for recommendations of good books and good authors!

Let me begin... I recommend:

Maryam Kabir Mashi
1. Kasaita
2. Menene abin yi?

Kasaita is probably the best Hausa lit. I have read! It's almost like a Hausa fairy tale set in Jos, complete with princes and

palaces and stretch limousines! The only problem is I have only read part 1 and apparently there's part 2 and even 3!!!! *sigh*

I have to hustle to find it now... Menene abin yi is a bit less fairy tail-y but also very interesting. Set in Kano about a

half Camerounian/half Nigerian girl.

Fatima Aminu Baba
1.  Haka ya isa!
2.  Auren Kisan Wuta

Haka ya isa is probably the most tragic/depressing book I have ever read (including Danielle Steel!) totally heart wrenching I

couldn't even read the part 2! But it's a very, very interesting story set in 1960s - ish *can't remember now, it's been a few years*

but it's really worth the read. It has a lot of wasan dandali, gayya and everything that makes grandma's stories so interesting..

good vintage Hausa stuff! Auren Kisan Wuta is a more fun and upbeat book but it has its serious side - hence the title. A must read!


Sadiya Yakasai
1.  Kawaici

Another good one. Very nice story about d'iyar Liman and an arranged marriage.

Like I said, I haven't read very many and I'm really looking forward to suggestions and reviews from those that have. :) :)

 :)

2
General Board / Video: Ribadu speaks out!
« on: May 23, 2009, 03:03:43 PM »

A video on the effects of corruption in Nigeria (and Africa!)

It's very sad, really. Brought a tear to my eye. Especially the Ibori case.

It is so disheartening! Can't believe it has come to this!


http://current.com/items/90080328_ribadu-testifies-before-the-u-s-financial-services-committee-prepared-by-sahara-reporters.htm

3
Literature / Future of Literature in Northern Nigeria
« on: June 07, 2008, 08:56:17 PM »


Hallo fellow writers/readers :)

Have a look at this article and let me know what you think...



Future of Literature in Northern Nigeria
By Professor OLU OBAFEMI
Tuesday, June 3, 2008


Writing, of the creative category is a lonely, lonesome, hazardous, in health and political terms, and a challenging vocation indeed—given the inclement socio-economic and socio-political ambience in our country, and in which the business of creative writing is carried on.

It is worsened by the tradition of grossly inadequate publishing outlets for the manuscripts produced with blood and sweat. It has been observed that nearly all the multinational publishers in Nigeria were/are based in Southern Nigeria. Two, they hardly establish branches to promote literature in the North. Having made their names and gains on the bleeding creative backs of Achebe, Soyinka, Clark, Ekwensi, they turned their backs on literature and obeyed the economic law of demand and supply of publishing commercially viable curriculum text books for primary and secondary schools.

The writers in the north were therefore never really patronized by these multi-nationals. The writers had had, either to approach relatively unknown foreign publishers or to self-publish. The consequence of either practice is unsavoury for the writers and their environment. Poor distribution and poor quality production. Most of the writers in the North are hardly on the curricuum in educational institutions in the South.

Even in the North, self-publishing authors, if they are not lecturers who can carry their works in Ghana-Must-Go and parade institutions where they go examining or conferencing, most of the other writers do not get read. Such writers who can afford to get their initial works published overseas could hardly be read in Nigeria—when there are hardly opportunities for local production rights or domestic distribution of their texts. As Sani Abba graphically expressed, most of those writers who opt for self-publishing suffer a similar fate; their works are ‘poorly publicized, inadequately reviewed, and rarely available in the book stores’.

Will these disadvantages hinder or eliminate self-publishing? Hardly possible, given the prevailing sociology of writing and publishing in the country today. Young writers are in a hurry to bear the name of authors—a condition for even becoming members of the umbrella writers’ organ—ANA. I have been a constant victim of this publishing hunger. I receive manuscripts with such injunctions as ‘kindly help me sir. The publisher wants to go to press next week’ or ‘the launching of the work is in a month’s time, my Chief launcher will travel immediately after’! What’s the use then, if the comments I may have will require a surgical re-work of the text. There was a particular occasion in which just as I was getting to read the text, its launching date was announced—in two days’ time!!

Some writers—young or old, or both, labour under the sad illusion that being an author is a passport to instant wealth. They need to do a little research as to why most authors today are not full-time writers. Some of us in the academia and the humanities must improve our CV—with evidence of published creative works, if they wish to be smiled upon by the Appointments and Promotion Committees. In any case, there are hungry publishers as there are hungry authors, in a mutual self-seeking game.

In spite of all these, and the inevitable proliferation of self-publishing, the nurturing of our literature is a factor, largely of its quality, of aesthetics of production, technical finish and content. Creative works must benefit from editing, objective assessment on publishability. Publishers, not printers, must do job of book production, if our literature is to be sustained with enduring values.
For a blossoming literary culture to emerge and be sustained, some of these steps must be taken and maintained.

To stimulate and enhance liteary creativity, literary competetions and contests, which used to be the practice in the colonial days need to be resuscitated. The colonialists did it in the 1930s. It should involve all departments of creativity in indigenous and foreign languages—drama, prose, poetry, short stories, film and video, etc. Attractive material rewards should be attached to winning texts. The successful texts should be distributed.

Government and corporate bodies must embark on wide distribution of the winning texts in schools and public libraries. The winning texts must be toured and read in many public institutions. If the colonialists did it with the result of an appreciable growth in the writing and reading culture of the time, there is even a greater need for our governments here in the North and the country generally to do so. Journals, magazines, newspapers should show greater interest in the publication and serialization of literary texts. The growth of a literary and reading culture in the South benefitted tremendously from the spaces which literary journals and newspapers devoted to works of literature. Black Orpheus, The Horn, Nigeria Magazine, Okike and so on, consciously helped to nurture literature. The example of Dandali which I mentioned earlier is worth emulating.

The defunct New Nigerian used to give focus to literature and to book reviews—especially under Abubakar Rasheed. The existing Newspapers like Daily Trust should be more vigorous in serving the course of literature.Governments, voluntary agencies and organizations should endow writers fellowships and offer literary prizes to motivate writers to train and write in a sustained and enduring manner. The fellowships should cater for writers’ needs—feeding, accommodation, and honoraria that will enable writers complete creative works in progress with less difficulty than it is now.

Asssociations related to literature—writing and reading—should enhance their activities of promotion and nurturing. ANA has created many literary prizes and is collaborating with government and corporate citizens on workshops, prizes endowments and seminars. Others, like Readers Association of Nigeria (RAN), the Literary Society of Nigeria LSN) the Association of Non-Fiction Authors of Nigeria (ANFAAN) should work more conscientiously to promote literary awareness, help build a reading and writing culture, Our libraries are virtually dead.

There are only very few public libraries in this country. There are fewer reading rooms around. Government should adopt a policy of acquiring at least 1000 copies of one successful creative text of every Nigerian author, registered with ANA and distribute them in libraries and reading rooms, which should now be rehabilitated, or re-built, as the case may be.

The electronic media have been of tremendous help to the growth of creativity in the north in the past. I have mentioned the role of the FRCN. The radio audience, of the Hausa programmes, for instance, is in millions.This could be replicated in the other languages of Tiv, Fulfulde, Kanuri, Idoma, Okun, Ebira, Nupe, Igala and so on. Radio Kaduna encouraged literary developmemt by regularly broadcasting poems, short stories, drama sketches and story-telling sessions. The broadcast of their creative works have availed the authors access to wide audiences.

My first dramatic text, Pestle in the Mortar, was broadcast on the radio/Television Kaduna in 1974 and it was of tremendous inspiration for me. The Hausa television drama evolved out of the broadcast of radio plays by FRCN. Literature is the soul of the society and no subsidy to develop, sustain and nurture it would be excessive. I thus urge the Governments who are directly or indirectly involved in this all-important Summit to invest in the literature of this region and grant generous subsidies to literary to institutions and literary people in their domains.

•Being the concluding part of a lead paper-Sustaining and Nurturing Creative Writing in Northern Nigeria, presented recently at the first summit of Northern Nigerian Writers, Minna, Niger State.

4
Literature / Chick Lit, Anyone?
« on: May 09, 2008, 04:08:45 PM »
Quote
Chick Lit ~ "Chick lit" is a term used to denote genre fiction written for and marketed to young women, especially single, working women in their twenties and thirties. Chick lit features hip, stylish female protagonists, usually in their twenties and thirties, in urban settings, and follows their love lives and struggles for professional success. "Chick" is the American slang term for young woman and "Lit" is short for "literature". The genre was defined as a type of post-feminist or second-wave feminism that went beyond female-as-victim to include fiction that covered the breadth of female experiences, including love, courtship and gender.
[/color]



Predictably, I happen to be a big fan of Chick Lit. Especially the kind with light and humourous

themes you can whip out, relax and read after a hard day’s work. So are there any chick lit fans

here? I’m talking of authors like Sophie Kinsella, Helen Fielding, Sue Townsend, Marian Keyes,

Swati Kushal, Cecilia Ahern, Cecily von Ziegesar etc. This is a good medium to review the chick lit

books you have read. Can’t wait to hear from you people!  :)


5
Literature / Harry Potter :: All is Well
« on: April 09, 2008, 11:12:42 AM »


I can’t believe we haven’t discussed Harry Potter and the Deathly Harrows in this Forum!

*gasp* it’s been almost a year since the finale!

Anyways, who enjoyed it? Who thought it was crap? What went wrong? What was right?

I wanna know your opinions.

Personally it was one of the best reads I have ever come across. It triggered a blend of

emotions. It was sad, funny, happy, scary, and downright ridiculous! That’s a good book to me.


SPOILER ALERT!

Please if you haven’t read it and don’t wanna know the story, don’t scroll down.


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Life After Hogwarts

In an interview, online chat, the Wizard of the Month section of her website, and during her 2007 U.S. Open Book Tour, J. K Rowling revealed additional character information that she chose not to include in the book. She stated that:

Harry becomes an Auror for the Ministry of Magic, and is later appointed head of the department. He keeps Sirius's motorcycle, which Arthur Weasley repaired for him, but he can no longer speak Parseltongue after the destruction of Voldemort's soul fragment within him.


Ginny Weasley plays for the Holyhead Harpies Quidditch team for a time, leaves to establish a family with Harry and later becomes the lead Quidditch correspondent for the Daily Prophet.


Ron Weasley works at George's store for a time, Weasleys' Wizard Wheezes, then joins Harry as an Auror.


Hermione finds her parents in Australia and removes the memory modification charm she had put on them for safety. She initially works for the Ministry of Magic in the Department for the Regulation and Control of Magical Creatures, greatly improving life for house elves and their ilk. She later moves to the Department of Magical Law Enforcement and assists in eradicating oppressive, pro-pureblood laws. She was also the only member of the trio to go back and complete her seventh year at Hogwarts.


After his death, Voldemort is forced to exist in the stunted form Harry witnessed in the King's Cross limbo; his crimes were too severe for him to become a ghost.


George Weasley continues his successful joke shop. George married Angelina Johnson and has two children: a son named Fred, in memory of his late twin brother, and a daughter, Roxanne.


Luna Lovegood searches the world for odd and unique creatures. She eventually marries Rolf, a grandson of the famed naturalist Newt Scamander. They have twins called Lorcan and Lysander. Her father's publication, The Quibbler, has returned to its usual condition of "advanced lunacy" and is appreciated for its unintentional humour.


Percy Weasley married a woman named Audrey and had two daughters, named Molly and Lucy.


Firenze is welcomed back into his herd, who finally acknowledge the virtue of his pro-human leanings.


Dolores Umbridge is arrested, interrogated, and imprisoned for crimes against Muggle-borns.


Cho Chang went on to marry a Muggle.


Neville Longbottom becomes professor of Herbology at Hogwarts and marries Hannah Abbott.


Besides Victoire Weasley, Bill and Fleur Weasley have a younger son and a younger daughter, named Dominique and Louis.


On her website, Rowling posted a Weasley family tree, showing that Harry's children's full names are James Sirius Potter, Albus Severus Potter, and Lily Luna Potter.


6
chit-chat / Islamic Pickup Lines.
« on: June 01, 2007, 01:44:26 PM »
Salaam Everyone,

Funny stuff I got from an online community i belong to. Enjoy...

I admit to the art of copy and paste


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

1.   I'm looking for the "Made In Jannah" tag.

2.   wanna date? i bought a whole box when i went to madinah"

3.   Marry me so I don't have to lower my gaze everytime you walk into the room..

4.   Girl you fine, I see that praying 5 times a day has really payed off

5.   Girl when i saw you i said mashallah, then i said inshallah

6.   Would you like to help me wake up for Fajr?

7.   Are you a Shiite? Because when I saw you, I said to myself, "She aiight"

8.   Are your feet tired? Because you've been performing Tawaaf in my mind all day long?

9.   How would you like to help me fulfill half of my deen?

10.   Girl...I know its haraam "paying" so much "interest" in you...but I can't help myself...

11.   Girl you're so hot, you make Shaytan sweat.You are the noor of my eyes.

12.   Your face shines with so much noor that it could launch a thousand (Jihadi) ships

13.   You are the reason hijab was mandated.

14.   I didn't trip over my robe, I fell for you.

15.   You're so beautiful, You would make hur-al-ayn jealous.

16.   Any cup of water that you pour for me will taste like Zam Zam.

17.   The noor on your face is soo strong, I think I'm going to go blind!

18.   Hey I'm a nice muslim boy and you seem like a nice muslim girl, so what do you say we make a halal match?"

19.   Allah created everything in pairs, so what are you doing single?

20.   Sister For a moment I thought I had died and gone to heaven. Now I see that I am very much alive, and heaven has been brought to me.

21.   I'd like to be more than just your brother in Islam.

22.   Will my platinum VISA cover your dowry?

23.   What school of thought do you follow because I thought about you all through school.

24.   It must be Laylatul Qadr. Because that's the night that angels come down from Heaven.

25.   I know Halal meat does a body good, but damn, how much you been eatin..

26.   Sister, you are a hijabi fitnah.

27.   You make me realise why we're asked to lower our gaze so much

28.   I love the way your Abaya flows when you walk

7
General Board / Yasser Arafat is Dead
« on: November 11, 2004, 08:13:02 AM »
Assalamu alaikum

Innalillahi wa ina ilahin rajiun

Yasser Arafat, the unchallenged Palestinian leader who fought for decades for statehood but was later seen by many as an obstacle to his people's dreams, died today in a Paris hospital after a lingering illness. He was 75

May Allah reward him, forgive him and protect him from the trial of the grave and the torment of the fire.

And for the palestinians, may Allah magnify your rewards and better your solace and forgive your deceased- Amin Allah ya jikanshi

8
Islam / Find your Islamic Birthday!
« on: June 24, 2004, 01:32:13 PM »
~*Salaam*~

Ever wanted to find out ur Birthday according to the Islamic Lunar calendar?

www.islam.com/islamicdates.asp

I just found out i was born on da 28th of Jumadal Ula, what's urs?

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