Author Topic: Maternal Mortality and Culture  (Read 5459 times)

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Offline Haladu

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Maternal Mortality and Culture
« on: July 01, 2005, 09:53:35 AM »
Dear Colleagues,

It disturbs me. This happened only yesterday, June 30, 2005.

I live outside kano now. I got a call from home that a lady in my neighbourhood that was pregnant had bee in labour for 4 days and the husband was yet to send her to the hospital. A good samaritan who lives near them called me because i knew i relate well with the husband.

I called the husband who told me that her condition was not the type for hospital. That she had "iska" for a long time and it is that delaying her delivery, and he was handling it traditionally. I asked him what her doctor said during her last antenatal visit. He said she never had any antenatal visit to any clinic!! I felt like crying. I took me a whole MTN recharge card to convince him to take her to a hospital. I told him i would call him back in 30 minutes.

I loaded another MTN card and called a doctor i know in kano. The doctor told me such cases are so rampant. He carefully explained to me how delayed labour can lead to anything including death. He agreed to proceed to his hospital (though it was late) to attend to that case if the husband could take her. I asked him to proceed to the hospital.

I called the husband back and asked him to take his wife to the hospital where a doctor was waiting for him. I gave him the doctor,s telephone number and name. I went back to bed.

In the morning i called the doctor to find out the condition of the lady. I was shocked to learn that the doctor stayed all night and the man did not appear at all. I called the man. He told me he was advised not to take her, instead a midwife was taken to his house to attend to the lady.

To cut the story short, the baby is lost, the mother can not stand on her feet, i learnt she has a thick watery substance dripping from her private part and she is still at home.

Is this how we kill our wives? is it in our culture? is it islamic? do we hate hospitals? what really is wrong? please help me understand this.

sincerely,

Haladu Mohammed

Offline EMTL

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Maternal Mortality and Culture
« Reply #1 on: July 01, 2005, 03:10:59 PM »
Assalamu alaikum,
Mallam Haladu your story is heart-touching, may Allah (SWT) guide us amiyn. It equally reminds us of our responsiblities (the elites) in our societies, of the neccessity of educating and correcting ourselves. May Allah (SWT) reward you bountifully and forgive our short-comings.

Islam has taught us how to deal with such cases of either elongated labour or 'Iska'. For instance,  Late Mallam Abubakar Gumi in his Tafsir, (Raddul...) has taught us a dua in order to recite to seek for Allah's help in cases of elongated labour.

The bottom line is such cases must be referred to Doctors, as you rightly did, and ofcourse to seek for knowledge.
In the Affairs of People Fear Allah (SWT). In the Matters Relating to Allah (SWT) Do not be Afraid of Anybody. Ibn Katthab (RA).

Offline mlbash

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Maternal Mortality and Culture
« Reply #2 on: July 12, 2005, 11:15:54 AM »
Quote from: "EMTL"
Assalamu alaikum,
Mallam Haladu your story is heart-touching, may Allah (SWT) guide us amiyn. It equally reminds us of our responsiblities (the elites) in our societies, of the neccessity of educating and correcting ourselves. May Allah (SWT) reward you bountifully and forgive our short-comings.

Islam has taught us how to deal with such cases of either elongated labour or 'Iska'. For instance,  Late Mallam Abubakar Gumi in his Tafsir, (Raddul...) has taught us a dua in order to recite to seek for Allah's help in cases of elongated labour.

The bottom line is such cases must be referred to Doctors, as you rightly did, and ofcourse to seek for knowledge.


hakkun, mr ETML, that's more like the lasting solution.
t is my intention to make the neglected aspect of our societies viable

Offline Ihsan

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Re: Maternal Mortality and Culture
« Reply #3 on: June 08, 2007, 10:28:28 PM »
It so hurt me to hear of such stories!!! before IT, I was interested in becoming a doctor...then a midwife...but then things changed.  Everyday u hear of heart retching stories like this!!! Again, awareness is an important factor here!!! The husbands as well the wives need to be made aware of the importance of antenatal and postnatal care!!! This is also an interest of mine: I want to have a mother and baby centre where such things will be discussed.  I wud like to encourage both parents to come to the centre (if not on the same day, on different days - we'll have mother's day and father's day).  I mean this is an issue that really need to be tackled!!! The husband at the end of the day wud not care a dime!!! it is the wife that wud end up having VVF of worse dead!!! and at the end of it all he'll abandon her at her parents and get himself a new wife!!!  and the parents (being what they are- at times) wud take her back before she's fully recovered and before u know it, another baby is on the way!!!
So insha Allah, this is also on my agenda...Allah dai Ya taimake mu baki daya.
greetings from Ihsaneey

Offline abeeda

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Re: Maternal Mortality and Culture
« Reply #4 on: February 27, 2008, 01:15:02 PM »
salam
       this indeed is a very serious problem we are facing esp in the north, maybe due to ignorance or poverty watever the case its really bad.
 but I think that alot of women and their husbands have a problem going to hospitals coz of the fact that the doctor that will examine the women is a male this may sound oldskul but i bliev its a factor

Offline gogannaka

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Re: Maternal Mortality and Culture
« Reply #5 on: February 28, 2008, 01:18:38 PM »
2 Days ago i took my friend to the hospital.He had a deep cut below his knee and the wound was bleeding even after the stiches he got in the morning.
On arrival at the hospital(a private one for that matter) the receptionist was busy outside chatting with her friends.We had to call her attention before she decided to come to the reception area. Now then,to find his card became a problema and we had to wait some 10 minutes before she could sluggishly find the card.She even told us to 'maybe come back tomorrow'.


While waiting patiently to see the doctor a woman now hurriedly entered the reception area looking distressed.She asked the receptionist if they would accept an emergency patient.The receptionist agreed.The woman now told the people waiting outside to bring the patient in.
What i saw was one of the horrific things i've ever seen. It was a woman bleeding like i've never seen.She was carried on a stretcher and blood was dripping.
I knew it was labour.
The baby was already dead and was removed.5 minutes later she died too due to excessive loss of blood.
The woman that brought her told the receptionist that they first took her to a chemist.The chemist/pharmacy, she said, had a professional doctor that treats people.He works at Aminu Kano teaching hospital.

Why should a woman die for giving birth?
Why should a woman die for bringing life to earth?

Our health care system is a mess.The rate of maternal mortality is too high in Nigeria.
Allah ya jikan wannan mata.(Talatu is her name)
Allah ya gyara mana wannan kasa.
Surely after suffering comes enjoyment

Offline SpeakOut

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Re: Maternal Mortality and Culture
« Reply #6 on: March 18, 2008, 11:29:27 AM »
Assalamu Alaikum everyone,

I am back. I started this discussion under my name, Haladu. I abandoned this group for a long time. A brother, Danborno, sent me a personal mail urging me to return. I forgot my password, so i registered again as SpeakOut.

An update on the issue:

That lady finally had VVF. The husband divorced her within the week. Her parents took her back. She had a successful operation. She remarried. On March 1, 2008 i saw her pregnant again !!. I pray she delivers successfully.

I am impressed by the interest generated by the story. I am more inpressed by the initiative of Daborno for inviting me back to the forum. I hope we stay in the discussion.

Warm regards

Offline HUSNAA

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Re: Maternal Mortality and Culture
« Reply #7 on: March 18, 2008, 03:45:02 PM »
Salaam haladu.
You are talking about the lady whose husband would not allow her to go to the hospital ko? Kai! wannan takaici har ina za a sashi? Shi ya janyo mata VVF din, kuma ya sake ta as a result... kaga irin wanna injustice din ko?
Ni as far as I am concerned, when it comes to matters of life and death as this, the consent of the husband is not necessary to get her to hospital. In ya sake ta in the process Wallahi she is better without him.
We all know that mixing of men and women is not allowed in Islam. Touching a woman who is not yr wife sister, aunt or mahram is not allowed in Islam. Yet when it comes to matters of life and death, for example if a woman was drowning, and a man saw her drowning, ba laifi akan sa if he goes and physically rescues her from the water. He has to touch her to do so, but there is no harm in that, because he is trying to save a life. I remember one time when one yr there was such a huge crush a Hajji wajen jifan shaytan, that was before the Saudi Authorities revamped wajen jifan shaytan din, I was told that one of our Sheikhs physically rescued a woman who fainted or was nearly crushed.. he lifted her bodily out of the crowds and brought her to safety and she was only known to him as a fellow muslim, not because she was his wife or in any way related to him. So irin wannan sha'ani, no woman who is in labor and experiencing difficulties should wait for the permission of her husband to go to the hospital. She has more right to go if she asks and he refuses, she shouldnt believe that she is doing wrong by disobeying him.
Ghafurallahi lana wa lakum

Offline HUSNAA

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Re: Maternal Mortality and Culture
« Reply #8 on: March 18, 2008, 03:47:40 PM »
2 Days ago i took my friend to the hospital.He had a deep cut below his knee and the wound was bleeding even after the stiches he got in the morning.
On arrival at the hospital(a private one for that matter) the receptionist was busy outside chatting with her friends.We had to call her attention before she decided to come to the reception area. Now then,to find his card became a problema and we had to wait some 10 minutes before she could sluggishly find the card.She even told us to 'maybe come back tomorrow'.


While waiting patiently to see the doctor a woman now hurriedly entered the reception area looking distressed.She asked the receptionist if they would accept an emergency patient.The receptionist agreed.The woman now told the people waiting outside to bring the patient in.
What i saw was one of the horrific things i've ever seen. It was a woman bleeding like i've never seen.She was carried on a stretcher and blood was dripping.
I knew it was labour.
The baby was already dead and was removed.5 minutes later she died too due to excessive loss of blood.
The woman that brought her told the receptionist that they first took her to a chemist.The chemist/pharmacy, she said, had a professional doctor that treats people.He works at Aminu Kano teaching hospital.

Why should a woman die for giving birth?
Why should a woman die for bringing life to earth?

Our health care system is a mess.The rate of maternal mortality is too high in Nigeria.
Allah ya jikan wannan mata.(Talatu is her name)
Allah ya gyara mana wannan kasa.

Subhanallah! AS RECENT AS THAT? OMG!! Lallai nothing has changed!!!
Allah Ya jikan ta. Allah Sarki!!
« Last Edit: March 18, 2008, 03:49:20 PM by HUSNAA »
Ghafurallahi lana wa lakum

Offline Dan-Borno

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Re: Maternal Mortality and Culture
« Reply #9 on: March 18, 2008, 04:02:24 PM »
Ki bari kurum Auntyn Muhsin, mutanen mu akwai son kai
sosai.  It is better for them to allow their women go to the
market than to the hospital - imagine irin duhun kai wannan?

I will attribute all these problems to lack of awareness among
both men and women, especially as to their rights as enshrined
in the Laws.  Because a woman can go to any length as far
as health is concern.  So, the more we enlighten these women
the better for us.

You are welcome back Haladu.
"My mama always used to tell me: 'If you can't find somethin' to live for, you best find somethin' to die for" - Tupak

 


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