Author Topic: Hausa Rap and Hip Hop Music  (Read 59563 times)

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Offline Abdalla

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« on: October 16, 2006, 01:10:46 AM »
Husna was griping about being bored. Well here's something exciting (at leat to me, as an ethnographer (wot?).

The Hausa music scene has been undergoing rapid transformation since the intrusion of global media sounds in Nigerian spaces, thanks to MTV and Channel O, and the intrusion of southern Nigerian musicians into the Hausa language sphere. When Eedris Abdulkarim (Yoruba born in Kano, based in Lagos) released Jaga-Jaga in 2005 he had a catchy tune in it, SEGARIN KANO (sic, Sai Garin Kano) which provided a technopop sound to a Hausa song. This was not the first time (Funmi Adams, anyone?, and Buari in Ghana, Saadou in Niger). This provided an encouragement for young MCs in Kano already immersed in producing music for the Hausa video film soundtrack to "wake" up to the fact that their language is being domesticated by Other.

In Niger Republic, Lakal Kaney released a tape, La voix du T?n?r? in 2000, but its availability on CD in 2004 propelled Hausa rap to a new international height -- they received offers to tour U.S. If you can get it, listen to ZAKARA YA KOKA (The Cock Crows). Fantastic!

Now in Kano, young "niggaz" started taking notice, and before you know it, we now have a whole army of Hausa rappers -- Abdullahi Mighty, Shaba, 2Pack, Kano Raiders (with their hilarious BAN CIN KWANTAN TSIRE), Khalid Kaccia, Billy O (check out BA NI TIBANI). The beat is based on the same equipment "real rappers" in the U.S. use -- Cakewalk Pro, FruityLoops, CuBase and of course the Yamaha Synthesizer (with PSR 3000 leading right now in Kano). Suddenly music studios also sprang up all over the place -- more than 15 at the last count.

This is all an example of media flows and eddies impacting on traditional society -- because the old traditional Hausa musicians have gone with the wind. In fact some of the young traditional musos have gone electric, particularly Abdu Boda Katsina, the asharalle musician.

So what do we thing of this? If there are responses, I might even report on the first HAUSA speaking FEMALE rap artist....

Abdalla

Offline bakangizo

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« Reply #1 on: October 16, 2006, 01:19:26 PM »
Thanks, Abdallah. I would love to listen to that Lakal Kaney you mentioned. Never heard of him/them. Here in Kano, I liked Abdullahi Mighty's music. I have his first album, Taka, and it was very good. He's talented, but like most of our endevours in this part of the country, lack of sponsors, producers and continuity has always been the bane. As for Kano Raiders, I haven't heard of the song 'Ban Cin Kwantan Tsire'. I only know of the also hilarious "Muna cikin Kunci".

And, yes, who's the famale rapper ? :lol:

Offline HUSNAA

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Re: Hausa Rap and Hip Hop Music
« Reply #2 on: October 16, 2006, 02:31:42 PM »
Quote from: "Abdalla"
Husna was griping about being bored. Well here's something exciting (at leat to me, as an ethnographer (wot?).


Abdalla

 Not anymore (wot?) :lol:  :lol:  :lol:  :lol:
What u have posted up there is really exciting Prof. Personally never heard of any one of them, let alone their music. Still  believe this is  a step in the right direction. I really really climb up the wall at those critics who moan about the loss of Hausa musical culture. Lets face it, if u werent born to it, its hard to immediately like a type of musical style, and I dont see why Hausa music should be limited to ganga, shantu or goge (all boring stuff if u ask me). I cant say I am a great fan of rap either, or all types of hip hop. But I can support Hausa rappers bcos rapping in itself is a linguistic art  and being in Hausa will make it doubly challenging for the artists because Hausa is a difficult language linguistically and also because so many indigenous words have been lost apparently. So its a challenge to see how they can come up with rhyming lyrics.
Ghafurallahi lana wa lakum

Offline mallamt

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« Reply #3 on: October 16, 2006, 08:31:39 PM »
Abdallah

Thank you very much for the information, it is very heart warming to hear of the efforts many like you and the various artist you have mentioned, put in to ensure the sustainability of hausa as a musical language in modern times - it is an extremely difficult task.

I have not heard of any of the artist you have mentioned and living outside nigeria for so long does not help matters, recently being in some parts of the continent and watching a bit of bigbrother nigeria I was amazed and pleasantly surprised by the creativity of young nigerian musicians.  It was sad though that not much of the music came from the north or had hausa used, it is important that while we may romanticise the times gone by we must remember there is also a present and try to use modern musical styles in preserving our language and culture.

Kindly let us know where we can get these CD's if they are available outside nigeria

Offline Abdalla

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« Reply #4 on: October 17, 2006, 03:27:40 PM »
Thank you all for your comments! Husna I agree with you that many would find the traditional instruments used in Hausa music boring, especially in these modern times of synthesizers that can mimic any sound, and computer music software. Do remember, though, that all traditional instruments are reflection of a the cultural heritage of a people and many communities strive to maintain them. I am sure you are aware that there many genres of music in Europe, for instance, ranging from Classical to World. The arrival of new musical form does not indicate the death or decline of others. The best form of fusion of new and old music in my view is in Malian music. Check out Ali Farka Toure (most especially his last album, SAVANE, released after his death in April 2006) and listen to the fusion of kora and blues guitar. Similarly, Adama Yolomba's MOUSOU is an incredible combination of the sound of Malian xylophone (don't know what they call it) and modern instruments.

I have put together a concert I call KUKUMA RAP coming up on 28th October 2006 at the British Council at 7.00 p.m. It is a world premier of Hausa Rappers jamming with Nasiru Garba Supa's band called AREWA. The Arewa would be playing kukuma, shantu, kalangu, duman garke, while the Rappers will be rapping on the beat -- all in Hausa! This is our way of combining the modern and the traiditional to show that they can in fact be combined. We are starting rehearsals on Wednesday next week during I will also introduce SHANTU RAP sol sequence  -- where a rapper will overlay his voice to the sound of Shantu (and the Shantu is played by a female, who is also a brilliant Koroso dancer!)

Your comments also made remember one niece of mine who saw a CD labled DAN ANACE. She wanted to know if he is a new rapper, thinking that DAN stands for Daniel!

If you live in the Kano region, I can send you an invitation to the concert (and of course others too!). Just let me know via email at auadamu@yahoo.com, so that I send it to BC.

Other comments deal with the aspect of production and distribution of Hausa rap music. This indeed is a problem. Most of the rappers are youngsters (in their early 20s) who simply can't afford the kind of money needed to produce (i.e. record, market and release) a CD. We are talking about N60,000 to N100,000 (less than $800 range). They simply can't afford that kind of money because they are either students, or working in some poorly paid job. Further, piracy is another big problem. The moment they release a CD, the next thing you know, it is hijacked by Kofar Wambai (Kano) pirates and the rappers get nothing out of it.

Most of the rap songs are now in what I can "demo" versions -- they record them in studios like Sulpher and take the MP3 versions to radio stations, particularly Freedom Radio (http://freedomradionig.com/). "Rainy Season" for instance, by Billy-O was a huge radio hit -- combining Hausa and English in a rap form (and to be performed at the Kukuma Rap concert!).

It is still abit tricky sending files to this forum, but I will try to upload samples of Lakal Kaney and others.

And the Hausa female rapper is Menne 710 -- she is not really Hausa as such, but the first Hausa female voice rapping. Her CD is easily available in Kano. It is called SOYAYYA NETASHI (Soyayya Na Ta shi). If you live in the Kano region, go to the Post Office, or the large roundabout near First Bank where the CD sellers hang out!

Abdalla

Offline HUSNAA

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« Reply #5 on: October 17, 2006, 04:36:49 PM »
Quote from: "Abdalla"
Husna I agree with you that many would find the traditional instruments used in Hausa music boring.


Not only the instruments, but the singers' voices themselves. So tuneless, one would think one was tone deaf, and so hoarse, you'd swear they were choking on a fishbone or their larynx was full of mucus. And the worst aspect was the glorification and praise singing that formed the staple for most of the lyrics. Anyway, there were exceptions to the rule as in everything and SHATA was certainly that, even though he praise sang (but he also cussed!!)  

Quote from: "Abdalla"
Do remember, though, that all traditional instruments are reflection of a the cultural heritage of a people and many communities strive to maintain them.


Yes well we have Gidan Makama. They can do nicely in there as  acoustic RELICS :lol:  :lol:

Anyway its a good thing they are getting a second chance at being appreciated by a totally different audience.


Quote from: "Abdalla"
Your comments also made remember one niece of mine who saw a CD labled DAN ANACE. She wanted to know if he is a new rapper, thinking that DAN stands for Daniel!


Lol that's one of the funniest things I have heard in an age. DAN indeed!! I suppose the ANACE would sound like Anase (as in anastasia) to yr ingenius niece!!!! What a girl!! What a 'rapper'!! :lol:  :lol:  :lol:
(I'm still laughing!!)
Ghafurallahi lana wa lakum

Offline sdanyaro

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« Reply #6 on: October 17, 2006, 04:39:37 PM »
Abdalla

Ferresa kenan.

Mudai rokon Allah muke, Allah yabaka rukon BUK...
Sai kayi! Sai kayi!! Sai Kayi!!!

... an all I can say here now, is just thanks. . .

Quote
It is still abit tricky sending files to this forum, but I will try to upload samples of Lakal Kaney and others.
Just send the MP3s to me and I will make sure that all that want to listen to or download them get them from here.

Offline Abdalla

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« Reply #7 on: October 17, 2006, 09:58:13 PM »
"Sai ka yi?" Ina! Ai shugabanci ba nawa ba ne, domin ni dan almajiri ne, kuma saurayi mai tashe! A dai kyale masu so su yi, sai mu mara musu baya da ni da sauran nigogi kamarmu!!!

Husna, I perfect agree with you some our traditional singers are out of tune -- lousy voices and all. And I salute your bravery in coming out and telling it like it is. We often get too carried away with awe at our traditional musicians that we tend to overlook their failings -- that some of them are really horrendous!

Further, Hausa music is already categorized as a lowbrow occupation, in fact categorized by M.G. Smith as belonging to "third class" in Hausa social status. We can appreciate how a singer does his art, but we can't afford to be socially associated with him. In fact the singers themselves consider their profession so lowbrow that in interviews they state they do not wish their children to inherit them (Shata, Sani Dan Indo, Garba Supa all said this in various interviews I have). But as you said there are quite a few good gems. One of the most brilliant and up-and-coming young KUNTIGI musician is Babangida Kakadawa from Gusau in Zamfara State (Nigeria). He is nic is Dan Marayan Zamfara. He is absolutely fantastic -- uses the kuntigi and follows Dan Marajos' art faithfully. I got them to peform together in 2004 at a concert in Kano, together with Rod Paterson from Scotland.  We have recorded the concert, and hopefully one day I may release it on CD. If there is interest, I may upload a smallish clip of his music -- to further confirm the superiority of the Sokoto/Zamfara axis in the sphere of Hausa traditional music.

And you got it right, my niece actully pronounced Anace as Anase! Hehehe. Youngsters, eh? She is into Rahina, Ciara, Shakira, Pussycat Dolls, etc -- whom I don't know, and felt embarassed asking a shop assitant at Virgin Oxford Street in September if he could help me locate these weird-sounding musos!

BTW, there is correction to my ealier posting regarding Malian music. I incorrected stated that Adama Yalomba (not Yolomba) produced Mousou. He did not, it was infact recorded by Neba Solo, and called MUSSOW. It was part of a Mossoulou CD collection I picked in Ghana sometime ago ( beautiful country, I almost got a job there!). The xylophone-like Neba played is called BALAFON. To make up for my sorry mistake, I will also upload Mussow for all to hear. And Husna, don't close your ears to this one!

Will be posting the MP3s to our admin tonight, insha Allah.

Abdalla

Offline Abdalla

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« Reply #8 on: October 18, 2006, 01:09:55 AM »
Jama'a, Sallama -- I am back! I have been able to upload quite a bushel of select music for your discerning ears to our server, and Salisu will soon do the magic trix needed to make sure you can hear or download it. The full listing of what I posted is:

1. Halimatu Sadiyya (Soultan Abdul)
2. Sanya Zobe (Abdullahi Mighty)
3. Amarya da Ango (Soultan Abdul)
4. Soyeyya (Menne 710)
5. Natashi (Menne 710)
6. Zakara Ya Koka (Lakal Kaney)
7. Musow (Neba Solo)
8. Billy Tibani (Shaba and Billy-O)
9. Tuzuru (Dan Marayan Zamfara)

This is a mixture -- a sort ofgrill. Soultan (sic) is not a rapper, but a Hausa Techno (think Yanni). Abdullahi Mighty and Menne are semi-rappers, including Ragamuffin in their works (they also collaborated on Menne's debut CD). Lakal Kaney are the biggest rap act in Niger (followed by Kaidan Gaskiya). This track -- like the rest of the album (check out the MP3 tag for full details) is brilliant. Billy Tibani is a gambara (wot?) format of rap by a young dude who purchased Tibani and could not pay because he has lost his wallet. Shaba of Sulpha Studio Kano provided the music, while Billy-O was on the vocals. Tuzuru is PURE traditional Kuntigi from Dan Marayan Zamfara, lamenting the fate of a Tuzuru (twentysomething who refused to get married, although he was gender biased; he was only yabbin the BOYS, did not include the gurls!

I hope it works out. If it does not, descend on Oga Admin. He is the whiz with these things.

Enjoy this Sallah goro from Kano Online Administration. More discussions, more samples. No discussion , samples hasta la vista, kapisch?

Abdalla

Offline admin

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« Reply #9 on: October 18, 2006, 10:35:46 PM »
Goron Sallah - Hausa Music Samplers  
http://www.dandali.com/audio.html#goro

The above link is where you can find the audio files in various formats (MP3, RealAudio, Windows Media, and Podcast). Please test the links and let me know as I did not have time to test each and every link.

Again thanks to Prof. Abdalla U. Adamu for these samplers. Also if anybody has any Hausa music files that needs to share with us, let me know as we can add them to our collection.

You will also notice that the link above will take you to the Audio section of dandali.com, which is one of our sister websites.
Kaini Kano ko a buhun barkono!!!

Offline HUSNAA

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« Reply #10 on: October 20, 2006, 07:14:02 AM »
Madallah da Goron Sallar nan to Proffessor AUA, and Admin.

Barka da Sallah to all Kano onliners

Allah Ya Karbi ibadar kowa da kowa ku ma Ya Biya wa kowa bukatun su.

Amin
Ghafurallahi lana wa lakum

Offline bakangizo

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« Reply #11 on: October 20, 2006, 09:13:11 AM »
Quote from: "admin"
. Please test the links and let me know as I did not have time to test each and every link.

Well, am having difficulties opening/playing the files. Kept getting error messages. Was only able to play/download 24% of two tracks. Thanks anyway.

Offline Fateez

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« Reply #12 on: October 20, 2006, 10:32:38 AM »
Thank you very much Prof and admin, they are very good indeed. Usually

i dont like hip hop, but i like this one. I've been absent mindedly humming

sanya zobe. Is it me or does the "zakara ya koka" singer sound like he

has a strong sokoto accent? He's from Nijar is it? I didnt know they have a

similar dialect.


P.S: what is Tibani? sounds like a kind of food...is it?



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Offline Fateez

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« Reply #13 on: October 20, 2006, 10:56:26 AM »
Quote from: "HUSNAA"
Not only the instruments, but the singers' voices themselves. So tuneless, one would think one was tone deaf, and so hoarse, you'd swear they were choking on a fishbone or their larynx was full of mucus. And the worst aspect was the glorification and praise singing that formed the staple for most of the lyrics. Anyway, there were exceptions to the rule as in everything and SHATA was certainly that, even though he praise sang (but he also cussed!!)  

 


Hehe, i must admit, some of them are boring, but some are still good.

I like those asharalle ones usually in weddings, i think it's the instruments

that attract me. Oh dont forget the katsina police band (i dunno if they

still exist) but they were really good in da late 90s. I like Sa'adou Bori....a

lot! In Katsina state there's this group of girls that go around called "yan

matan Nana Haire" from 'Baure. They r not bad even tho it's kind of the

old fashioned style of singing. What happened to Attine Jibo? Does

anyone remember her? She sang the "Mamana my devoted" song

sometime in the 90s. She had a few more songs and mysteriously

disappeared after that.  :?
"Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.    ~ Mark Twain


Offline HUSNAA

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« Reply #14 on: October 20, 2006, 07:30:28 PM »
Quote from: "Fateez"
Quote from: "HUSNAA"
Not only the instruments, but the singers' voices themselves. So tuneless, one would think one was tone deaf, and so hoarse, you'd swear they were choking on a fishbone or their larynx was full of mucus. And the worst aspect was the glorification and praise singing that formed the staple for most of the lyrics. Anyway, there were exceptions to the rule as in everything and SHATA was certainly that, even though he praise sang (but he also cussed!!)  

 


Hehe, i must admit, some of them are boring, but some are still good.

I like those asharalle ones usually in weddings, i think it's the instruments

that attract me. Oh dont forget the katsina police band (i dunno if they

still exist) but they were really good in da late 90s. I like Sa'adou Bori....a

lot! In Katsina state there's this group of girls that go around called "yan

matan Nana Haire" from 'Baure. They r not bad even tho it's kind of the

old fashioned style of singing. What happened to Attine Jibo? Does

anyone remember her? She sang the "Mamana my devoted" song

sometime in the 90s. She had a few more songs and mysteriously

disappeared after that.  :?

I wasnt referring to mucisians like Saadu Bori ( I dont know Nana Haire, I remember the song Mamana though). I like Saadou Bori and Dan Asharalle and also Dan Asabe, I think is his name.

Ever heard of the song of the following lyrics?
'Jihar Kano ta Ado, ashirin da biyar kana mulki yau murna muke yi'.

Useless, tuneless,  sycophantic and above all horrible! If u have heard of it at all, that is the kind of catawauling I am talking about.  

Sa'adu bori and the likes of him have got their acts together of course, except that I cant stand 'Aliyaa' or any of the other songs by this female artist from...where? She's got a good voice, but she's always out of sync with the tempo of her music.

Tibani is a type of danwake that is steamed in maize leaves. Because it is wrapped in maize leaves, it looks like a lozenge. It tastes pretty much the same as danwake, since the difference is in the way it is cooked and also the shape. however, I believe it has more flavor than danwake by virtue of the fact that it is steamed, and steaming tends to preserve the natural flavor of food better than boiling.
I like the rap song by billy tibani best. It is so lyrical, and very witty and  and he's also got this combination of english and hausa words which rhyme at the end of a sentence and also make sense in the context that they were put in. I believe he is quite talented. I hope that he goes far.

Prof Abdallah, is there a possibility that any of these musicians could find air time on Charlie Gillett's World of Music? an around the world musical program aired by the above named man on BBC radio?

PS I have never liked Dan Maraya's music. I cant stand the twanging of his 'molo' (kuntigi?).
Ghafurallahi lana wa lakum

 


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