Author Topic: Private Universities approved.. where are we???  (Read 15041 times)

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Offline jewel(abdulgee22)

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Re: Private Universities approved.. where are we???
« Reply #15 on: May 04, 2007, 08:05:13 AM »
Ikon Allah.. all these Universities are in the south ... closest to the north is FCT, haba jama'a..!!!!...


Ni gani nake yan arewa sunfi yawa a gwabnatin nigeria.
Sune masu fada aji, kuma masu sa hannu.
But please where is their heads when such is happening?
Ko bamu da kishin karatu ai we are entitle to equal opportunity ko?

Kuma ni inna gani rashin wider opportunity na karatu a kusa, yana daya daga cikin abinda yake discouraging din northerners.

Masu kudi kuma insun boye basuyi aikin Allah da dukiyarsu ba, to in suka mutu yaya kenan?
Inna dai ganin duk wani musulmi kyakkyawar makoma yake nema.
Boye dukiya dazata iyya chetar ran wani kuwa, ba kyakkyawan guziri bane.

Kuma in sun mutu subarwa yaran da basu san zafin kudinba, su kuma su shiga aikin asha dasu ko.
Chan lahirar basu tafi da mai kyau ba kuma nan duniyar sun bar mara kyau kenan.
Allah ya sawake!

 myself, make i tell u somethin yan arewa are no were in gwamnatin 9ja, where r u ppl, go to any ministry in that abuja kawai u will keep seeing bodas and nnans sai kuma sauran yan middle belt, while yan arewa su ne masinjoji, deribe, yeah come to think of it, b4 i can remember b4 u pass the gates of any minsitry u see malam as maigadi, well open ur eye well well, as the comin of security companies, u will would have notice the change.
Sorry to use this language, wai what the hell are we people doing ne? Have we ever sit dowm in that arewa council and think for once where r we headin? Gaskiya Allah ya isa, wallahi since i cant abuse here with the respect to Adminn oza members.

If u see the way i am being talked about here, yau ga malam yazo karatu  ??? ??? ???, i was in a Nigerian Family Association Meeting some days back, some was so suprise wai someone from kano is here studyin, "i was angry  >:( to the extend that i repield him, wht the hell r u think....we only sale cows, i told him b4 his father has seen a book my great grand oldy did 500yrs a go in d north".

If there is any Northern Leader that might come across this, u people better know that u are d main essence of our national destruction, govenment incompetence, lack of dignity, corruption, lack of discipline, justice, trust, self determination and self esteem of every northner. Because if u where good leaders u would have become our MENTORS, but rather.............kai.
« Last Edit: May 04, 2007, 08:10:23 AM by jewel(abdulgee22) »
for those that sleep their dreams is a reality, wake up is just an illussion."

jewel of d nile.

Offline Dan-Borno

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Re: Private Universities approved.. where are we???
« Reply #16 on: May 04, 2007, 09:11:59 AM »
90% of mega rich ppl in Nigeria got their wealth in an illegal way.
HUSNAA thanks for your comments, but please do you have any statistics or reference to any studies done that we can check this particular fact out? Thanks gain...

Danyaro, are you disagreeing with Husna's statement?
"My mama always used to tell me: 'If you can't find somethin' to live for, you best find somethin' to die for" - Tupak

Offline Dan-Borno

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Re: Private Universities approved.. where are we???
« Reply #17 on: May 04, 2007, 09:21:45 AM »
Check this out:

LOOTED MONEY DISCOVERED IN FOREIGN BANKS


NAMES OF DEPOSITORS       LONDON(£)   SWISS($)   USA($)  GERMANY(D)

GEN IBRAHIM BABANGIDA       6.25bn     7.41bn     2.00bn     9.00bn
GEN ABUBAKAR         1.31bn     2.33bn    800M   
REAR ADMIRAL MIKE AKHIGBE  1.24bn     2.42bn      671M      1.00bn 
GEN JERRY USENI                  3.04bn     2.01bn     1.01bn      900M
ALH ISMAILA GWARZO            1.03bn     2.00bn     1.3bn       700M
ALH UMARU DIKKO                  4.5bn      1.4bn       700M       345M
PAUL OGWUMA                      300M      1.42bn      200M       500M 
GEN SANI ABACHA                 9.01bn     4.09bn      800M       3.01M
MOHAMMED ABACHA             300M      1.2bn         150M        535M
ABDULKADIR ABACHA             700M      1.21bn        900M       471M
ALHAJI WADA NAS                 600M      1.32bn       300M             
TOM IKIMI                           400M      1.39bn        152M       371M
DAN ETETE                         1.12bn     1.03bn      400M      1.72bn
DON ETIBET                         2.5bn      1.06bn      700M       361M 
MAJ AL MUSTAPHA               600M      1.001bn     210M
ANTHONY ANI                      2.9bn      1.09bn      360M      1.66bn
BASHIR DALHATU                  2.3bn      1.001bn     161M      1.43bn
GEN WUSHISHI                    700M      1.301bn                     
ALH HASSAN ADAMU             300M        200M      700M               
T Y DANJUMA                      300M        200M      700M             
GEN ISHAYA BAMAYI           120M        800M

*SOURCE: WORLD BANK TO THE PRESIDENT OF NIGERIA
"My mama always used to tell me: 'If you can't find somethin' to live for, you best find somethin' to die for" - Tupak

Offline _Waziri_

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Re: Private Universities approved.. where are we???
« Reply #18 on: May 04, 2007, 11:28:55 AM »

Dan-Borno


The above list is not authentic in anyway. We have debated it in several forums many months ago. In truth, Nigeria never had the sum total of the monies said to have been stolen in the above list. Sdanyaro, was right about the question he asked Hajiya. The truth of the matter is where are the rich men in Northern Nigeria that do not help? Very few, I tell you. All else are only living on the shadows of abundance. Na tuwo kawai suke samu. Think about the whole of business activities being done in Nigeria, you will find that Northerners do not have anything. Jewel, seems to have said it all when he pointed out that even in civil service we are nowhere.

jewel(abdulgee22),

Pls get me some mo info bout d free education in Sweden you are talking about. I know alot of ppl to tip up down here. I undastand with u in your frustration.

I agree with Fateez that if there is no University in the North, why won't Northerners go to the South  or anywhere to read? Infact I was even shocked to hear Nigeria approving another lists of Univerisities when the ones we have are not truly measuring up to what Universities should really be. I guess they will only join the queue of the  usual institutions we have that are understaffed and without facilities only moni and name gets one the certificate.

I heard ASUU Chairman, the other day saying our Universities  need about 57,000 lecturers but only have about 15,000. That each department needs more than 1 Professor but now many departments do not have any Prof.

Lastly when I checked the ranking of Universities in Africa, I was shocked the more to find out how the in list of 100, the first 45 were not in Nigeria and that the Nigerian Universities in the second 45 are all in the South-West. Also no Northern University is in the top 100 African Universities. Yet, our government is busy creating more and more of them. What a pity?! Pls read the list yourself in this link:

  http://www.webometrics.info/top100_continent.asp?cont=africa

Offline HUSNAA

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Re: Private Universities approved.. where are we???
« Reply #19 on: May 04, 2007, 12:56:12 PM »
90% of mega rich ppl in Nigeria got their wealth in an illegal way.
HUSNAA thanks for your comments, but please do you have any statistics or reference to any studies done that we can check this particular fact out? Thanks gain...

No stats, just rule of thumb!!  ;D, but fairly accurate, given that ba mu da tycoons wanda yau za ka ce 'eh ga hanyar halaliyar da suka mallaki billiyoyin su'.


Quote from: Waziri
Sdanyaro, was right about the question he asked Hajiya. The truth of the matter is where are the rich men in Northern Nigeria that do not help? Very few, I tell you. All else are only living on the shadows of abundance. Na tuwo kawai suke samu.

I said mega rich nigerians not ' mega rich northern nigerians'. Besides ai akwai mega rich northern nigerians din ba wai babu ba, kuma ba sa taimakon. In da suna yi ai da duk yadda suka so su boye aikin alherin da sukeyi, yau da gobe sai anji labarin sa.

As for the billions purported to have been stolen by the above mentioned ppl, why should it not be an authentic list? Ba OBJ a ka baiwa list dinba? OBJ was president from 1999 to date. If you scroll down the list, u find ppl who have been stealing money tun from the second republic din Shagari, which is some odd 30 yrs back or so. Kuma wai ai the current status of accounts dinsu ake bayar wa, ba wai abin da suka raruma ba initially, therefore, they have had time to build a juicy stream of compound interest on top of the principal. Ko kuwa without the interest accruing to the money ne za a lissafa? Secondly, most must have invested the moneys in some stocks and bonds, foreign companies and the likes for which the banks will be responsible for the safe keeping of. So to say wai Nigeria doesnt have or never had that kind of money is a ridiculous statement because if the Nigerian treasury had invested the money that was looted by these individuals, ai maybe ma da Nigeria would have had fiye da haka, because the sum total of the interest that will accrue will be more than the individual sums put together, since we are talking of compound interest.
Ghafurallahi lana wa lakum

Offline Dan-Borno

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Re: Private Universities approved.. where are we???
« Reply #20 on: May 07, 2007, 02:30:50 PM »
Madalla Waziri - kayi dai dai amma fa:
Even if the above list is not authentic, you will
quite agree with me that more than 50% of the
mega rich men are either retired civil servants
or political office holders - but not business
tycoons.  Then how come did they enmass
such a wealth, while we all know their source of
income?  We are left with no option than to accept
the fake list in the absence of any.

Whatever whatever, we all knew that these people
and others are still defrauding this country.
Allah ya isanmu.

We have mega rich people in Northern Nigeria, but
i think we should make this a different thread, where
we are going to analyse each and every name we
mention in this forum, but we have to be certain about
who is a richman first.
"My mama always used to tell me: 'If you can't find somethin' to live for, you best find somethin' to die for" - Tupak

Offline Fateez

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Re: Private Universities approved.. where are we???
« Reply #21 on: May 09, 2007, 04:53:29 PM »

if there is no University in the North, why won't Northerners go to the South  or anywhere to read? Infact I was even shocked to hear Nigeria approving another lists of Univerisities when the ones we have are not truly measuring up to what Universities should really be. I guess they will only join the queue of the  usual institutions we have that are understaffed and without facilities only moni and name gets one the certificate.

I heard ASUU Chairman, the other day saying our Universities  need about 57,000 lecturers but only have about 15,000. That each department needs more than 1 Professor but now many departments do not have any Prof.

Lastly when I checked the ranking of Universities in Africa, I was shocked the more to find out how the in list of 100, the first 45 were not in Nigeria and that the Nigerian Universities in the second 45 are all in the South-West. Also no Northern University is in the top 100 African Universities. Yet, our government is busy creating more and more of them. What a pity?! Pls read the list yourself in this link:

  http://www.webometrics.info/top100_continent.asp?cont=africa




My point exactly! New universities are not even going to solve half our

problems. What's happening in new private universities today? They open

and lure all the good academic staff that were not appreciated in the govt

universities and these lecturers and professors sun ga kudi their eye will

open and they leave for their relatively prestigious university to a new private

uni just because they will be payed better. That is how all our good professors

that used to join forces together to make a strong govt university will leave one

by one to make weak private unis. Anyi ba ayi ba kenan. A university is not a joke.

It takes a lot more than one good prof to work it. Personally, they'll get good pay

but they have no idea how the simple choice they will make will ruin the education

of thousands in the future.

"Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.”    ~ Mark Twain


Offline Fateez

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Re: Private Universities approved.. where are we???
« Reply #22 on: May 09, 2007, 05:45:05 PM »

We have mega rich people in Northern Nigeria, but
i think we should make this a different thread, where
we are going to analyse each and every name
we
mention in this forum, but we have to be certain about
who is a richman first.




...and this is helpful because...?





If u see the way i am being talked about here, yau ga malam yazo karatu  ??? ??? ???, i was in a Nigerian Family Association Meeting some days back, some was so suprise wai someone from kano is here studyin, "i was angry  >:( to the extend that i repield him, wht the hell r u think....we only sale cows, i told him b4 his father has seen a book my great grand oldy did 500yrs a go in d north".




Don't ya think you took it a little too personally?? Wouldn't you ask da same

question if you saw an Akwa Ibom guy schooling in the University of Madina??



As for universities, we need them.. plenty. The ones we have now have overflowed their capacity, that is why u find that unless u have long leg or a godfather, even the university education as lame as it is in Nigeria yana neman ya gagari dan talaka.




How about increasing the capacity or let me rephrase, how about

making new universities under the names of the old ones? How about

getting rid of corruption in instituitions? How about reforming all the

instituitions? How about having certain criteria which instituitions have

to reach before getting an approval as a university? Old universities that

have lost their groove should be discontinued and reformed or merged

until they are competent enough to stand alone. Wouldn't it be better to

upgrade polytechnics than approve new universities out of the blue? Something

seriously has to be done. Oh and talking about private universities helping out

the masses, aren't these universities expensive? In the end, who is going to

benefit from it? *sigh* here really is a lot to be done. I'm seriously shocked

that even the great Ife OAU didnt make it to the top of the list. 


"Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.”    ~ Mark Twain


Offline jewel(abdulgee22)

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Re: Private Universities approved.. where are we???
« Reply #23 on: May 19, 2007, 07:42:35 PM »

We have mega rich people in Northern Nigeria, but
i think we should make this a different thread, where
we are going to analyse each and every name
we
mention in this forum, but we have to be certain about
who is a richman first.




...and this is helpful because...?





If u see the way i am being talked about here, yau ga malam yazo karatu  ??? ??? ???, i was in a Nigerian Family Association Meeting some days back, some was so suprise wai someone from kano is here studyin, "i was angry  >:( to the extend that i repield him, wht the hell r u think....we only sale cows, i told him b4 his father has seen a book my great grand oldy did 500yrs a go in d north".




Don't ya think you took it a little too personally?? Wouldn't you ask da same

question if you saw an Akwa Ibom guy schooling in the University of Madina??



As for universities, we need them.. plenty. The ones we have now have overflowed their capacity, that is why u find that unless u have long leg or a godfather, even the university education as lame as it is in Nigeria yana neman ya gagari dan talaka.


[/b]

How about increasing the capacity or let me rephrase, how about

making new universities under the names of the old ones? How about

getting rid of corruption in instituitions? How about reforming all the

instituitions? How about having certain criteria which instituitions have

to reach before getting an approval as a university? Old universities that

have lost their groove should be discontinued and reformed or merged

until they are competent enough to stand alone. Wouldn't it be better to

upgrade polytechnics than approve new universities out of the blue? Something

seriously has to be done. Oh and talking about private universities helping out

the masses, aren't these universities expensive? In the end, who is going to

benefit from it? *sigh* here really is a lot to be done. I'm seriously shocked

that even the great Ife OAU didnt make it to the top of the list. 




Ranki shi dade,
Wallahi to answer your questions, truthfully  "i will not" fisrt of all becuase university of madina is an islamic univeristy and i dnt think only the northners r muslims in 9ja. Infact i have a friend in Al Azhar University study who is from Enugu (and is a muslim) and it has neva come to my mind y is that guy there, but rather i see him an only say Allah ya nunawa wani bawansa hanyar gaskiya.

I am not a Gypsy (no fortune tellin), astrologer, cant read peoples mind, not their hearts..................................amma fa bahaushe yace labarin suciya a tambayi fiska. So that was y i gave him that answer.
And by the way, it is never personal.
for those that sleep their dreams is a reality, wake up is just an illussion."

jewel of d nile.

Offline fulanee

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Re: Private Universities approved.. where are we???
« Reply #24 on: May 19, 2007, 08:20:39 PM »
Ga inda suke samun biliyoyin su:
 INVESTMENTS- OIL AND GAS, FOREX etc  ;D
« Last Edit: May 20, 2007, 11:45:55 PM by fulanee »

Offline sheriff 05

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Re: Private Universities approved.. where are we???
« Reply #25 on: May 20, 2007, 12:58:48 AM »
Alanguro (Dan Borno) and Hajia Husna, please permit me to disagree with you. It's a shame that we have grown to think that the rich owe us anything out of their wealth. We have to understand the glaring difference between zakah and sadaqah.

The only obligation on the path of the rich is Zakah for which wars were fought in ancient times. I can say that nearly all our rich people pay their Zakah as is obligated on them. Whether or not we approve of their methods, so long as they adhere to Islamic injunctions, how they choose to pay their zakah is entirely up-to them. Any additional expenditure on their part would constitute sadaqah, for which they are under no obligation what-so-ever to pay. While Allah encourages sadaqah, it is by no means compulsory. Therefore, as with such voluntary issues, the inability of anyone to give sadaqah and the corresponding reward/punishment (if any) can only be judged by Allah, not by us.

Having said this, our educational system requires a lot more than 2.5% zakah payments from the wealth of our rich, to bounce back. The idea is to develop an economically viable system of educating the people. The private universities springing up in the south while relying immensely on capital funding from private parties, are built on solid business plans that would aim to give these institutions financial independence from their original founders.

Our fundamental problem is that we lack vision. We lack solid discipline for long term business management, and we’ve lost a great sense of the organisational discipline Islam has given us. The mere fact that we feel any rich person is obligated to us is a reminder of our problems. We have to see our solutions lying in not relying on anyone but on proffering credible and sound business ideas and principles upon which we can found buoyant, long lasting, flexible, dynamic and efficient learning organisations.

I admire the organisational energy our brothers from the south have. But I am always quick to point out that our vision and organisational acumen is a lot better, the only problem is that we have grown to rely on what other people have and think of them as ours. That has to stop. The rich owe us nothing. They may (with a very big question mark) however be willing to invest in education, should we have a more robust and solid organisational strategy with which we’ll ensure that their investments are not wasted. Unfortunately, we don’t have that. We’d rather waste our time castigating them.

Malama Fateez, I wish to kindly point out that I have no problem with going to study in the south. But you have to see the wider picture. The presence of educational institutions, imply the presence of a system to train all classes of people within a state’s social fabric, from leaders to civil servants. Ideologies, leaders and professionals (Doctors, Lawyers, and Architects) are born and developed and armed with the right frame of mind to fit into and develop the region as a whole. Education is a source of identity and an underlying catalyst for development. Investments for development will be stunted with a stunted educational system and so many other issues as well. Therefore, the shortage of such educational institutions and the loss in the quality of the present one’s is a source of major concern, which is all that I intended to point out.

Offline HUSNAA

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Re: Private Universities approved.. where are we???
« Reply #26 on: May 20, 2007, 09:06:31 AM »
Alanguro (Dan Borno) and Hajia Husna, please permit me to disagree with you. It's a shame that we have grown to think that the rich owe us anything out of their wealth. We have to understand the glaring difference between zakah and sadaqah.

The only obligation on the path of the rich is Zakah for which wars were fought in ancient times. I can say that nearly all our rich people pay their Zakah as is obligated on them. Whether or not we approve of their methods, so long as they adhere to Islamic injunctions, how they choose to pay their zakah is entirely up-to them.

The mere fact that we feel any rich person is obligated to us is a reminder of our problems. The rich owe us nothing.  We’d rather waste our time castigating them.


The rich owe Nigerians something out of their wealth because most of them STOLE the money from the Nigerian populace. They did not acquire it legally, that is why. If the money was gotten legally, many Nigerians wouldnt  be in a quandary today.  We would have adequate healthcare, potable water supply system,  electricity  and industries that offer employment. Even the education system would be adequate today.
Public  funds that are supposed to be used to enhance the lives of the average Nigerian go mysteriously missing for ever.  Sometime ago, EFCC unearthed the NPA scandal  of N83billion which was mismanaged or stolen while Bode George was part time Chairman.  What about NEPA? Let me quote an excerpt from Nigerian Budget Monitoring . Anyone can read the full report from this website:

Projecthttp://www.budgetmonitoringng.org/Spotlights/2007/04/10/News11850/

The estimates of government spending in the power sector between 1999 and 2005 came to about N1.3 trillion (about $9billion). Some of this money went directly to the Power Holding Company of Nigeria (formerly NEPA), while the rest went to capital spending in for different schemes. Special Adviser to the president on power, Joseph Makoju, admits that between years 2000 and 2005, government had given PHCN a total of N225 billion for its operations. Of this amount, 60 per cent was spent on transmission and 15 per cent on the upgrading and expansion of lines. Unfortunately with so much spending the power sector has witnessed little boost in the output. Indeed since 2005, power generation has been on a consistent decline. In May 2005, it dropped to 3000 MW, about 50 per cent of what it was earlier on in the year.  At present the figure has further dropped to 1000 MW. Government says that the unrest in the Niger Delta has worsened the power situation. According to Makoju, the canalization of pipelines and refusal of militants to allow workers repair damaged gas lines have contributed to the worsening power situation.
 
However these may be the superficial causes. Former power and steel minister, Liyel Imoke told journalists that it may take up to 50 years before Nigerians can truly expect stable electricity supply. According to Imoke, “The current growth of the Nigerian economy stands at seven per cent. If the power sector grows at a rate of seven per cent per annum from now on, we will take another 50 years to catch up on where we should be and that is a real challenge.” His prescription, “if we set a target for growth of the economy at 10 per cent, then indeed, the power sector has to grow in the region of 12-15 per cent, each year. And when you translate that into cash, it means (a consistent) investment in the region of $10 billion each year.”


What about  Alamiwyeseigha? Just a little excerpt:

The Royal Bank of Scotland who assisted the Metropolitan Police in gathering evidence for an operation code named 'Heimdal' identified a suspicious transaction involving a company named 'Rapid Trades of Nigeria Ltd'. This company paid a whopping sum of money to another company named 'Santolina Investment Corporation' whose Director and Sole Signatory for the account is Chief D. S. P. Alamieyeseigha.
 
A) Enquiries made by the Police in UK at Nationa1 crimina1 Intellligence service (NCIS) further confinned that Chief D.S.P  Alamieyeseigha is the sole Director of the  company i.e Santolina Investment  and the company holds an account with the National Westminster Bank opened on 6, January, 2004 and at one time the account balance stood at £3 million. Upon the examination of the account, it was discovered that several lodgments originated from Nigeria. Chief D S P Alamiwyeseigha  has a Personal Account with Barclays Bank Plc. The  account was opened on 15th January, 2004 and by 15th Februaiy, 2005 the account balance stood at £203,753. 34. The account shows several large deposits while two credits had been identified to have originated from Nigeria.
 
B) It has also been established that Chief D. S. P. Alamieyeseigha is a Director of a company named Solomon & Peters Ltd (Chief D S P Alamieyeseigha's two middle names). Four London Properties namely: 247 Water Gardens London, W2 2DG purchased on 20/08/2003, 14 Mapesbury Road  London, Nw 2 4JB purchased for £l.4million.on 6/7/2001;  Flat 202 Jubilee Heights, Shoot up Hill, London NW2 3UQ purchased for £240 OOO.O0 and 68-70 regent Park Road, London, N3 purchased for £3million were found  to be registered in nthe company's name.

The Conveyancing file for the purchase of 247 Water Gardens shows various sources of funds but one transaction emanated from Triumph Bank Plc in Nigeria. The transfer was for £894, 990.00 on the 3/7/2005 while the Solicitors who acted for the purchase were a certain Austin and Jed.   
Read the whole on


http://www.dawodu.com/bayelsa2.htm

What about Dariye? Just a little excerpt:

  The facts are that on 20th January, 2004, while conducting a search at 127 Chiltern House, Portland St, London SE17, in connection with a suspected case of theft of computer equipment via internet purchase, the Metropolitan Police found £11,560.00 (Eleven thousand, five hundred and sixty pound) in a locked briefcase.
2. The said sum was claimed by one Christopher MEKWUNYE who asserted that Joshua DARIYE gave him the money to deposit into his account with Barclays Bank, London.
3. The search revealed documents including a Barclays Bank statement (Ace. No. 701970410) in the name of Joshua Chibi DARIYE with an address of Flat 28, Regents Plaza apartments, 8 Greville Road, London NW6. The statement showed a one off credit of £918,029.00 (Nine hundred and eighteen thousand, twenty nine pounds) transferred in on 27th August, 2002.
4. Subsequent search of DARIYE’s address yielded financial documents indicating that he also banked with National Westminster Bank Plc and held a Barclay card.
5. Enquiries with these banks have shown that he operates two (2) accounts with Barclays Bank with balances of £826,493.50 and £46,057.15p, respectively. Similarly, he operates two (2) accounts with National Westminster Plc with balances of £175,000.00 and $80,000.00.
6. In all, DARIYE is known to operate eight (8) UK Bank accounts, seven (7) of which are sterling accounts while one (1) is a dollar account.


http://www.dawodu.com/dariye2.htm

Dariye and Alamisiegha are just two who were unlucky to be caught. Bode George is scot free and his is probably worse than these two. There are others. What about the Petroleum Trust Fund case? The two premier arms of Nigerian legislation are hedging about it and refuse to admit the guilt of the President in the whole fiasco.
       
OK  let us assume that the rich owe us nothing. Don’t the rich control the resources of Nigeria.  If u were looking  for a job, how soon would it take for u to get employed?  Most of the time you need to have a godfather to get employed in Nigeria and the very word godfather is reserved for the rich in Nigeria, and u would never get employed because of merit. Just look at what is currently happening  today.  Politicians are hijacking senate /house of rep posts and other top positions for their relatives. Wives and sons of governors and political party heads, daughters of presidents  and others that I have forgotten have all got tickets to political appointments because their spouses/parents used public funds to  buy them the offices. 

No I cant agree that the rich owe the poor nothing. They can only owe us nothing if they live and let live. As it stands, the case with the Nigerian rich is live and let die. So I wont be made to feel like I am a lazy parasite just leaching on to the rich. I work hard enough in my life and I still don’t get the returns commensurate with my hard work in Nigeria simply because there are those out there who will not give me my fair share or what is due to me. Every Nigerian is entitled to get a share of Nigeria’s wealth commensurate with his work and by God millions of Nigerians are hard working ppl, who are constantly shortchanged by a very few. It is not fair and anyone who holds the view of not being owed is either  from the caliber of the mega rich, or doesn’t live in Nigeria and therefore is not affected by this Nigerian disease.


« Last Edit: May 20, 2007, 09:08:24 AM by HUSNAA »
Ghafurallahi lana wa lakum

Offline Fateez

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Re: Private Universities approved.. where are we???
« Reply #27 on: May 20, 2007, 10:03:26 AM »


I get your point HUSNAA. The people you mentioned are governers or all in

leadership positions. Those ARE the people we are supposed to blame for not

providing us with what we need - not innocent business people that Dan Borno

mentioned, those who have nothing to do with the governing body. There is a

difference between blaming people in government positions and blaming the "rich"

people. If the person was paid to provide to the people and he/she didnt, then

yes, we can blame them for our suffering. But if the person derived his/her wealth

elsewhere (Which I think Sheriff was referring to) then they have no obligation to

provide for us and we have no right to blame them for our problems.

"Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.”    ~ Mark Twain


Offline Fateez

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Re: Private Universities approved.. where are we???
« Reply #28 on: May 20, 2007, 10:33:15 AM »

Our fundamental problem is that we lack vision. We lack solid discipline for long term business management, and we’ve lost a great sense of the organisational discipline Islam has given us. The mere fact that we feel any rich person is obligated to us is a reminder of our problems. We have to see our solutions lying in not relying on anyone but on proffering credible and sound business ideas and principles upon which we can found buoyant, long lasting, flexible, dynamic and efficient learning organisations.




Word!




Malama Fateez, I wish to kindly point out that I have no problem with going to study in the south. But you have to see the wider picture. The presence of educational institutions, imply the presence of a system to train all classes of people within a state’s social fabric, from leaders to civil servants. Ideologies, leaders and professionals (Doctors, Lawyers, and Architects) are born and developed and armed with the right frame of mind to fit into and develop the region as a whole. Education is a source of identity and an underlying catalyst for development. Investments for development will be stunted with a stunted educational system and so many other issues as well. Therefore, the shortage of such educational institutions and the loss in the quality of the present one’s is a source of major concern, which is all that I intended to point out.


It's not like there are no universities in the North. There are many. Both private

and government-run ones. We should remember that a "new" university doesn't

necessarily mean a "good" university. Development doesn't depend solely on the

availability of an institution. The quality and attitude of the sudents are also very

important. The old ones need a thorough clean-up. Achieve that, and we shall see

a difference. It's not an easy task, but it's not impossible either.

"Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.”    ~ Mark Twain


Offline sheriff 05

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Re: Private Universities approved.. where are we???
« Reply #29 on: May 20, 2007, 02:26:26 PM »
Malama Fateez, thank you for helping me clarify my position. You are indeed correct. The rich I refer to are those who amassed their wealth through "non-governmental" means.

I understand your position on corrupt political office holders Hajia Husna. Yes, they betrayed the trust that the people put in them. I am not a person accustommed to discussing political issues, because in all honesty, I have been directly affected by their "actions and in-actions" more than you would know, and therefore I have completely lost hope in our political elite. That is why I am forced to remind you that the crux of this Post is not on whether or not political office holders are guilty of corruption, or whether or not they should invest stolen wealth in education (both issues on which you may be correct and obviously much more well informed than my humble self). What we are discussing here is the future of education in the north and how we can rebuild our social and economic fabric to match the very best in the world.

Malama fateez, I agree with you that we have enough institutions in the north and that fixing them may be a better option. But you fail to see the logic in my argument. The present crop of Institutions are government owned. Therefore, fixing them will depend on the will of the government and the integrity of our leaders, which as Hajia Husna has convincingly pointed out, is a hopeless case. Therefore my logic is that private institutions founded on sound ethics and principles will give the economy much needed flexibility, are more susceptible to change and less embedded in the government’s "un-ethical" tendencies.

This is a BBC report Excerpt:

In his recent visit to Latin America, the pope Benedict, speaking in Spanish and Portuguese to the bishops in Brazil's holiest shrine city, also said Latin America needs more dedicated Catholics in leadership positions in the media and at universities.
"This being a continent of baptized Christians, it is time to overcome the notable absence -- in the political sphere, in the world of the media and in the universities -- of the voices and initiatives of Catholic leaders with strong personalities and generous dedication, who are coherent in their ethical and religious convictions," Benedict said.

This captures my point hajia. The private uni's we see in the south are aimed towards achieving just this. It's not the next few years I'm worried about, It’s the whole impending generational loss I am concerned about. We either re-adapt or we continue to suffer.

We need institutions that train the next generation of leaders, technocrats and great visionaries upon which the north may rely. If our present crop of institutions, constantly suffering from the neglect of government, could give us this, then Alhamdulillah. We both know that government Institutions as we have them now will take forever to reform. I am a product of ABU zaria and while there I swam in political circles and therefore I can categorically tell you that if we're waiting for those set of leaders as the leaders of tomorrow, then tomorrow will be very dark indeed. Hence my advocacy for better oriented, better operated, more globally focused, yet culturally unique first class institutions with which we can reclaim our heritage. This is quite simply my point. If we can achieve these with the present crop of institutions and political leaders, then Alhamdulillah. If not, then we have to consider alternatives. One of which in my opinion, is private Institutions. Salam.

 


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