Author Topic: NIGERIAN PILGRIMS - WHICH WAY FORWARD  (Read 16581 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Dan-Borno

  • Super Member
  • *****
  • Join Date: Jan 2007
  • Location: Maiduguri
  • Posts: 2389
  • Gender: Male
  • EVERYTHING HAPPENS FOR A REASON
    • View Profile
    • Dan-Borno
Re: NIGERIAN PILGRIMS - WHICH WAY FORWARD
« Reply #15 on: January 15, 2010, 12:24:02 PM »
thanks Sarkin Bakan Kline, i am very interested, waiting for
your invitation.


"My mama always used to tell me: 'If you can't find somethin' to live for, you best find somethin' to die for" - Tupak

Offline HUSNAA

  • Super Member
  • *****
  • Join Date: Dec 2005
  • Location: In Limbo
  • Posts: 2944
  • Gender: Female
  • Life's but the blink of an eye:spend it gratefully
    • View Profile
Re: NIGERIAN PILGRIMS - WHICH WAY FORWARD
« Reply #16 on: January 18, 2010, 02:26:37 AM »
Those pics are disgraceful. Wallahi gara ai scrapping the Hajj board and let private entrepreneurs take over. Kunsan ma keeping the hajj pilgrim boards is just one more way of enriching ill deserving govt officials.
Ghafurallahi lana wa lakum

Offline Dan-Borno

  • Super Member
  • *****
  • Join Date: Jan 2007
  • Location: Maiduguri
  • Posts: 2389
  • Gender: Male
  • EVERYTHING HAPPENS FOR A REASON
    • View Profile
    • Dan-Borno
Re: NIGERIAN PILGRIMS - WHICH WAY FORWARD
« Reply #17 on: January 18, 2010, 11:29:12 AM »
Those pics are disgraceful. Wallahi gara ai scrapping the Hajj board and let private entrepreneurs take over. Kunsan ma keeping the hajj pilgrim boards is just one more way of enriching ill deserving govt officials.

auntyn muhsin, ki bari kawai, kinga, before the actual hajj period,
pilgrim official at least visits the holy land 4x all in the name of
preparatory to the hajj and in the cause of the travelling, they spend
huge sums of money as all expenses is build up on foreign currency
and in this case dollar.

after the successful pre-hajj visits Nigerian pilgrims still suffer with
no improvement.  the worst thing is that the pilgrims board don't take
cognisance of a problem and taking care of it in the next coming
hajj.

the picture below  is where I stayed during our stay at Mina, because
the tents allocated to us is grossly inadequate and cannot accommodate
more than 40% of us, this is something you have paid for.  Bakangizo
basu labarin irin ruwan saman da aka tafka, to wallahi half a kanmu because
the tent couldn't accommodate us.




we have even reached a stage where you must see the Land Officer before
you are even allocated a space as you can see above.
"My mama always used to tell me: 'If you can't find somethin' to live for, you best find somethin' to die for" - Tupak

Offline Abdalla

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Join Date: Oct 2002
  • Posts: 123
    • View Profile
Re: NIGERIAN PILGRIMS - WHICH WAY FORWARD
« Reply #18 on: January 18, 2010, 01:18:53 PM »
I was privileged to perform the Hajj twice (2000, and 2001), though not as a government official ;D, but with the fruits of my almajirci. I even wrote a small book about it which I called The Pilgrim's Progress. I was prevented from publishing it -- or even excerpts of it -- because it'd tantamount to "dabawa kai wuka" as the officials admonished me; they'd rather I give them the manuscript so that they can correct the lapses I pointed out at a policy level. I refused because I wrote the manuscript in the form of a personal diary -- detailing every single process of the Hajj operation from Kano to Saudia, and the return process -- including the first ever demonstration by the stranded pilgrims at Makka and Jeddah airport (where we were dumped by Kabo Air for over three days). Back in the early 2000s, it was very common for pilgrims to be stranded for weeks at the Jeddah airport. Kabo Air – perhaps the worst airline in the history of aviation, next to Nigeria Airways (now Virgin Nigeria) – would just follow the instincts of a typical dan koli and dump Nigerians and begin to ferry West African pilgrims, and then returns to Nigerians (and those from Kano received the worst treatment). Funny, I would have thought Kano, then Nigeria, then West Africa would have been their priority; or at least they should stick to the schedule of arrival and departure. This caused so much problem at the airport that later the Jeddah airport authorities shifted all Black pilgrims to a disused part of the airport with little facilities – “ku je can ku karata!”

From my experience, the over-crowding at Mina that Alhaji (ahem) Dan Barno pointed out was actually caused by the large number of un-registered, and therefore illegal adventurers who crash-landed into tents that contain either Blacks or Nigerians. Many of them are "international", while others are "Tukolor (Tukaru)" who did not pay any form of tent fees and just simply gate crashed into the tents -- overstretching their habitation limits and putting further stress on health and restroom facilities. When I did the Hajj, the cleaners (mainly Bengalis) rarely come to the Nigerian side at Mina because it’d always be messy. So we resorted to using the public restrooms along the pathways of the tent city. Of course you dare not enter into the tent areas of Arabs – they have fierce custodians who shoo you away as if you are some kind of animal.

Of course the blame has to go on the officials of the Pilgrims Suffering Welfare Boards. The ones in Kano used to be terrible; but the Jigawa ones are fantastic – courteous, focused and highly organized, which accounts for why many Kano intending pilgrims prefer to go via Jigawa. In Jigawa, for instance, they label the tents of “others”, i.e. non-Jigawa indigenes who follow the Jigawa route, which makes it easy to trace people (traced two friends that way, and kicked myself for not going via Jigawa). Thus a strict register of who should be in the tents ought to be kept, and someone should monitor it; but they could not be bothered to do that – everyone was busy shopping for one Chinese rubbish or other.

Offline _Waziri_

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Join Date: May 2004
  • Posts: 479
    • View Profile
Re: NIGERIAN PILGRIMS - WHICH WAY FORWARD
« Reply #19 on: January 18, 2010, 02:07:56 PM »
The scenario as painted is quite pathetic. I think there was a time when FGN considered pulling out from the exercise at every level. What happened to that consideration, I don't know.

  On a different note. I would want to hear your observations regarding the popular "Tukaro" forming the segment of our people who live there permanetly. What we hear is they are living in a ghetto or a slum there.

Offline bakangizo

  • Super Member
  • *****
  • Join Date: Apr 2005
  • Location: Kano
  • Posts: 1925
    • View Profile
Re: NIGERIAN PILGRIMS - WHICH WAY FORWARD
« Reply #20 on: January 18, 2010, 02:43:57 PM »
@ DB

Yeah. I remember the rain. What saved me was that we were among the first to get to Muna (middle of hte night). So we even had to choose tent 8). Amma gaskiya na tausaya wa wadanda basu samu wurin a ciki ba. It is a pity, and unfortunate. Wallahi tausayi yasa dole we had to make out space for those outside. We ended up about 30 of us in the tent.  

@ Abdalla

I think Kabo Air has "improved" from their previous performances. At least the criteria of 'first come, first go' was followed to a certain extend. But they do still abandon Nigerian Pilgrims, turning their attention instead to other countries. I was opportuned to speak with a pilot with the Nigerian Police, who's a friend to one of their pilots. He informed us that Kabo Air ferried pilgrims from Indonesia, Malaysia and Senegal. Probably why they were stretched. Hadama ce kawai. We spent about 24 hrs at Jedda. When I got tired of rumours and called a friend of mine to confirm to me if actually one of Kabo's plane that we were  told had left Kano and is on its way to Jeddah, he told me that the plane actually diverted to Dubai with some passengers. They just don't handle nigerian pilgrims with the seriousness with which they handle those of other countries. Talk of charity begins abroad ;D

Offline Abdalla

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Join Date: Oct 2002
  • Posts: 123
    • View Profile
Re: NIGERIAN PILGRIMS - WHICH WAY FORWARD
« Reply #21 on: January 18, 2010, 03:22:03 PM »
On a different note. I would want to hear your observations regarding the popular "Tukaro" forming the segment of our people who live there permanetly. What we hear is they are living in a ghetto or a slum there.

Oooh, you got me there! When I did the Hajj, I did notice the appalling conditions the Tukolor lived in -- including the pathetic sights of amputee children being peddled around by their parents, the runs they had with authorities who confiscate their wares etc. If they know you are Hausa, they ignore you – and target their begging at a more Whiter skin. To the Pakistani and Indian merchants who control the trade systems in Makka and Madina, all Blacks are the same, and rarely do they bother to distinguish between genuine Hajjis and Tukolor – preferring to treat all with the usual contempt of someone who is Brown. And as for the Arabs (Saudi and all) – their racism is the worst; e.g. putting a physical barrier between you and them so that you don’t rub shoulders during  prayers; ignoring you when you enter their designer shops (because they thought you can’t afford to buy Polo, Armani, YSL or Chanel items).  So yes, the Tukolor in Saudia (at least in Makka and Madina) live in ghettos, slums and are the underdogs; but then they do things no White Arab will do – wash cars, carry loads, and their women do menial jobs around the house, often leading harrowing stories of sexual abuse. Their often illegal status means they are worse off than Asians (e.g. Filipinos, Bengalis, Pakistani, and the new Russians from Azerbaijan).

Based on these observations, and conversations with a few Tukolor who came close enough to be interacted with, I started outlining a book on the lives of Hausa Diaspora, purely as an ethnographic account of how people live in a strange land and how they negotiate their culture and identity (although many of the Tukolor were Hausa, their mindset was rather different from your typical Hausa). This is actually a sub-set of another project, Hausa Arabs: The Arabs in Northern Nigeria that I am still working, and which looked at how Arab immigrants integrated (or refused to integrate) with the dominant Hausa cultural identity.

 A series of obstacles put paid to the project. First was lack of access to the Hausa Tukolor in Saudia. As many were illegal immigrants, they were too afraid to talk and thus betray themselves. Most hid out until during the Hajj when they emerge and mingle with Hajjis, as to the Arabs, all Blacks are the same. A further variable of this lack of access is their lack of structured research-based education. They simply don’t understand they have stories to tell that teach lessons about racial integration and tolerance, and how they could use new media to explain themselves.

Second was lack of funding. There is simply no agency that can house this kind of research for its anthropological significance – at least that I know of. Agencies sponsoring research usually do so on the basis of their own agendas – not the researchers.  Third, I don’t have the kind of personal funds needed to conduct the study (for it involves residency in Saudia for at least six months – a prospect I don’t relish, for once you take away Makka to Madina, Saudi cities are is just like any third rate American city, and I have had enough of those).

But availability of funds from whatever source is overshadowed by the first obstacle – negotiating access to the Tukolor. The moment they see you with pen and paper, they clam up, and often become suspicious and hostile. I remember drawing hostile stares as I walked through the back alleys of Makka – far away from the Harami – with a notebook and pencil, trying to record the stench and  filth (including a dead cat on a rubbish heap!) which contrasts with the false ultra-modern façade of the Harami area.

Waziri, since you are a whizz at obtaining funds (I have seen you in action), maybe you can take this up with some “big shots” who might be interested in a research for its own purpose (as a contribution towards understanding human nature) rather than as other means? The obvious clients are the Saudis themselves – for it will provide them with a  mechanism of dealing with foreigners, though understanding them. But their structured and institutionalized racism is enough to put anyone off.

Offline bakangizo

  • Super Member
  • *****
  • Join Date: Apr 2005
  • Location: Kano
  • Posts: 1925
    • View Profile
Re: NIGERIAN PILGRIMS - WHICH WAY FORWARD
« Reply #22 on: January 18, 2010, 03:49:26 PM »
Ashe 'Tukari' ya samo asali ne daga 'Tucolor'. What does it mean? Two Color?

It is a pity really the type of life our people live there. Left you wondering why on earth someone would leave here only to end up living a life where he/she is a constant target of harrasement, rasism, abuse, subjugation.

Prof, you mentioned that you've written a book on the Hajj process. What do you think of our intention to our proposal? Advice.

Offline Abdalla

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Join Date: Oct 2002
  • Posts: 123
    • View Profile
Re: NIGERIAN PILGRIMS - WHICH WAY FORWARD
« Reply #23 on: January 18, 2010, 06:02:46 PM »
@BKZ

For full information about the Tucolor, see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toucouleur. I understand the term was used to refer to Blacks in Hijaz -- apparently because the Futa Jallon Blacks were earlier arrivals in Hijaz. Now it's used in the same way Americans use "nigger" to refer to any Black person in Hijaz.

About the book, yes, I think it is a fantastic idea. My own diary is quite dated, but I could contribute a chapter or so if needed.

Offline HUSNAA

  • Super Member
  • *****
  • Join Date: Dec 2005
  • Location: In Limbo
  • Posts: 2944
  • Gender: Female
  • Life's but the blink of an eye:spend it gratefully
    • View Profile
Re: NIGERIAN PILGRIMS - WHICH WAY FORWARD
« Reply #24 on: January 19, 2010, 01:58:33 AM »
@BKZ

For full information about the Tucolor, see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toucouleur. I understand the term was used to refer to Blacks in Hijaz -- apparently because the Futa Jallon Blacks were earlier arrivals in Hijaz. Now it's used in the same way Americans use "nigger" to refer to any Black person in Hijaz.

About the book, yes, I think it is a fantastic idea. My own diary is quite dated, but I could contribute a chapter or so if needed.

Yr Hajj memoirs of 2000/2001 and what ever research u did in that area cant be dated at all unless the situation there has changed which from all indications is not the case. I urge that u do not selectively edit the material when u write it.Rather do a comparative study if u like of what was then and now and see what changes have been implemented if any, since the whole exercise is geared towards getting the concerned authorities to implement some meaningful welfare policies.
Ghafurallahi lana wa lakum

Offline _Waziri_

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Join Date: May 2004
  • Posts: 479
    • View Profile
Re: NIGERIAN PILGRIMS - WHICH WAY FORWARD
« Reply #25 on: January 19, 2010, 12:07:01 PM »
Prof,

This is interesting and sad at the same time. On the part of Saudi Arabia I see a show of insensitivity inconsistent with Islamic provision (at least for a state which claims to be Islamic). For Saudi has only succeeded in creating black ghettos similar to what was obtained in the USA of the 1960's(drawing the line from my reading of Alex Haley's Autobiography of Malcom X). But while the USA has invested in liberating the ghettoed environments, to a degree, since the blacks are treated as American citizens, Saudi Arabia is yet to be seen making efforts to consider the ghettos and their inhabitants as official part of what makes Saudi Arabia. The blacks are still seen as foreigners. Or who says the country belongs to the Arabs only, especially considering the fact that Islam does not put a criteria for becoming a national of any nation on race or color. The Ulama there will not muster the courage to tell the leaders this hard truth.

Among the Tukaru I learnt are many whose parents were born there and still they are denied privileges, they are tagged foreigners. And it appears that the Saudi government is not ready to kick start a policy process that'll look into what these ghettos are and what to do with them. This is why they may not be interested in the type of research you may want to undertake.

On our part, Nigeria doesn't think there's the need to negotiate a policy with Saudi, that will make sure the ghettos and their ppl are seen as part of the Saudi nation/nationals. Nigeria doesn't have a defining philosophy  that compels it to protect  its ppl anywhere.

Also as Hausa, rich men here do not care. Even religious organisations and those individuals who wear religion on their arms and shoulders will not see this as a worthy endeavor.

But truly research as this you are proposing coupled with a catchy well captured  video documentary, for all to view, in Hausa, English and Arabic,  is needed for the sake of the information it can provide not even for policy guidance and implementation.

Well, Prof. if you are not able to generate funds for this work with all the NGOs and the abundant network of ppl you know how can a Waziri be able to do anything? Maybe Sanusi Lamido Sanusi will like the idea if contacted and help talk to some ppl who'll provide for such kind of research. Or Kano State through its Adaidata Sahu outlet.

Offline Abdalla

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Join Date: Oct 2002
  • Posts: 123
    • View Profile
Re: NIGERIAN PILGRIMS - WHICH WAY FORWARD
« Reply #26 on: January 19, 2010, 02:08:30 PM »
Prof,

The Ulama there will not muster the courage to tell the leaders this hard truth.
....
And it appears that the Saudi government is not ready to kick start a policy process that'll look into what these ghettos are and what to do with them. This is why they may not be interested in the type of research you may want to undertake.
...
Also as Hausa, rich men here do not care. Even religious organisations and those individuals who wear religion on their arms and shoulders will not see this as a worthy endeavor.
...
Maybe Sanusi Lamido Sanusi will like the idea if contacted and help talk to some ppl who'll provide for such kind of research. Or Kano State through its Adaidata Sahu outlet.

Now with all these "maybes" and uncertainties, how can it be possible? Nah, I'll just troddle along on my own, hoping to be left some legacy from a rich patron ;D

Abdalla

Offline _Waziri_

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Join Date: May 2004
  • Posts: 479
    • View Profile
Re: NIGERIAN PILGRIMS - WHICH WAY FORWARD
« Reply #27 on: January 19, 2010, 03:36:16 PM »
Prof,

The Ulama there will not muster the courage to tell the leaders this hard truth.
....
And it appears that the Saudi government is not ready to kick start a policy process that'll look into what these ghettos are and what to do with them. This is why they may not be interested in the type of research you may want to undertake.
...
Also as Hausa, rich men here do not care. Even religious organisations and those individuals who wear religion on their arms and shoulders will not see this as a worthy endeavor.

...
Maybe Sanusi Lamido Sanusi will like the idea if contacted and help talk to some ppl who'll provide for such kind of research. Or Kano State through its Adaidata Sahu outlet.


Now with all these "maybes" and uncertainties, how can it be possible? Nah, I'll just troddle along on my own, hoping to be left some legacy from a rich patron ;D

Abdalla

Lol, @Prof  tis beta we start on a pessimistic note but I surely have some "big shots" I can talk to who may be interested. There is a possibility that we can even reach the Saudi embassy. But can one trust a Bakano with such a massive fund? ;D ::) :)

« Last Edit: January 19, 2010, 04:44:13 PM by _Waziri_ »

Offline Abdalla

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Join Date: Oct 2002
  • Posts: 123
    • View Profile
Re: NIGERIAN PILGRIMS - WHICH WAY FORWARD
« Reply #28 on: January 19, 2010, 06:57:29 PM »
Hehehe! Ka manta mu ke da Kundila da Alhassan Dantata daDangote? Zariya ko sai rimaye kawai -- wadda sun fi matayen su alkhwari ;D ;D

I know you'd come through -- maybe we can go to the fieldwork together, since you speak Arabic and I don't!

Abdalla

Offline IBB

  • Super Member
  • *****
  • Join Date: Mar 2003
  • Location: kano
  • Posts: 1651
  • Gender: Male
  • Mashaallah
    • View Profile
Re: NIGERIAN PILGRIMS - WHICH WAY FORWARD
« Reply #29 on: January 19, 2010, 08:30:51 PM »
Prof,

Among the Tukaru I learnt are many whose parents were born there and still they are denied privileges, they are tagged foreigners. And it appears that the Saudi government is not ready to kick start a policy process that'll look into what these ghettos are and what to do with them. This is why they may not be interested in the type of research you may want to undertake.


I dont think Saudi ghetto are any cause of concern for me. Because I think thats their own issues. We have our own problem to deal with here at home.

Dont you think the ghetto in Saudi is better than mud houses (that would prob not survive this Aug rain) in Kano and those pollution of open gutters, and those pile of rubbish in the centre of  inhabitants.

Well they would have come back if Nig is better.


Prof,

On our part, Nigeria doesn't think there's the need to negotiate a policy with Saudi, that will make sure the ghettos and their ppl are seen as part of the Saudi nation/nationals. Nigeria doesn't have a defining philosophy  that compels it to protect  its ppl anywhere.

Also as Hausa, rich men here do not care. Even religious organisations and those individuals who wear religion on their arms and shoulders will not see this as a worthy endeavor.


I wonder why should Nigeria negotiate with Saudi. This people choose to live like that, morever you dont expect another country to tell another how to run its country because its citizen migrate to theirs.

If you suggest negotiating with Saudis on how to bring them bck that will be great.
IHS

 


Powered by EzPortal