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Author Topic: Bomblasts in Kano and not an utter on Kanoonline  (Read 4764 times)
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gogannaka
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« on: January 23, 2012, 11:10:14 AM »

Over 200 people dead,you would expect 'Kanoonline' to bear full details. But not a single post or condemnation. Kai gaskiya da sake!
I am ashamed.

May Allah SWT protect the People of Kano and Nigeria.
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« Reply #1 on: January 25, 2012, 10:34:17 AM »

Ina ga ko dai suna shakkar commenting ko kuma rudewa yasa masu rubutun sun manta da Kanoonline. Ni ma nan na so in ga karin bayani. Amma babu.
 Amma Yallabia GGK, ja gaba mu fara ji daga bakin ka!
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« Reply #2 on: January 25, 2012, 02:43:01 PM »

We should be ashamed, yeah. I wish it were those days...the forum would have been "inundated" with comments, analyses and the like.

Amin to the prayer.
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« Reply #3 on: January 30, 2012, 07:15:04 PM »

@ All friends, I am very sure, its the nature of the website, too colonial for a SNS.

When Boko Haram bombarded Borno in 2009, a whole thread was created and many
have contributed towards understanding what BH is all about.  As at that time, ALL
are seeing the issue as only a feud between the then Borno State Governor (SAS)
and the BH Members, so, ALL mind only their business forgeting the hausa adage
which says, in gemun dan uwanka ya kama da wuta, kaima ka shafa wa naka ruwa.
Not even Yobe State dared to commiserate with the people of Borno not to talk of
proffering solution to the problem despite the fact that the problem started from
Yobe State (Machine, Kanamma).

Its good to be keeping record, and for the record, I hereby reincarnate some of the
posts made by our friends.


one thing that is now baffling me is that, those who saw them as
at the time of the action, they said they number up to 6000, however
note more than 500 was killed including their leaders, where are the
rest of at least 5000?


Now, anya wadannan mutanen basu da hannu a kisan Sheik Ja'afar da kuma rikicin Panshekara a Kano?

BKGZ, ai we discussed somewhere in this forum the possibility of the group being behind the murder of Sheikh Ja'afar.
It wasn't long after his death that they unleashed themselves in panshekara.

DB raised a question that if only 300 out of thousands were killed then where are the remaining? That is exactly the question i asked when they attacked Kano in 2007.The army claimed to have arrested just 3 of them while reports say that they were in the hundreds.
Wai what was their plan ne? To incapacitate the police and army and then enforce the sharia themselves?
Or was it to overthrow the government?

It is unfortunate and i can understand how residents of the cities would feel.
Allah ya kare mu.
 

Ni dai yanzu, I have no doubt what so ever 100% sure wa'yannan su suka kashe Sheikh Ja'afar. Kuma the most amazing thing is that tunda an san da wa'yannan sect din and alaqar su da Sheikh Ja'afar before, it is a great wonder that the Police and SSS and the all the other intelligent services never put two and two together over the matter to arrive at the same conclusion from the glaring evidence. Yes sune suka kai harin fanshekara sometime back, around the same time they murdered Sheikh Ja'afar.
A kwai ayah a suratul Hajj in da Allah SWT Yake fada cewa


It will also be interesting to know who their financial backers and supporters are…

It is also commendable that the news and media outlets have referred to this group with the name “Boko Haram / Yusufiyya” instead of the usual stereotypical names usually and wrongly referred to these kind of groups in the past, and actually started to use when the first incidences started.

By the way, how many other sects/ fringe groups have military wing?


Assalamu alaikum,

Your account was very touchy, DB. I nearly wept. Cry

The end result always befalls the downtrodden.

May Allah, the Exalted, grant those died innocently an eternal peace, amen.

May Allah, the exalted, prevent re-occurrence of such a thing, amen.


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gogannaka
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« Reply #4 on: January 31, 2012, 11:03:20 PM »

DB thanks for resurrecting the thread.

This whole BH saga is one of the most difficult issues to solve in Nigeria. It is clear that the group is ahead of the FG.
We have 2 situations that make it more difficult:
1.The people still don't believe the group is behind the attacks
2. The federal govt seem clueless,plus it is fighting a psychological warfare. Firepower is not solving the problem.

With these problems i dont see an easy solution to this crises.
Recently in Kano and Maiduguri,people are loosing patience and getting angry at the law enforcement agents. Reports are coming in showing how the military are harrassing innocent people. A friend told me his girlfriends mum was asked to frog jump in front of her kids. They had to protest angrily before they were abused and let go without her doing the frog jump. With these kind of atrocities how do you expect sympathy or co-operation from the public?

Allah ya kashe mana wannan wutar.
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Nesta
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« Reply #5 on: February 07, 2012, 11:34:23 AM »

DB thanks for resurrecting the thread.

This whole BH saga is one of the most difficult issues to solve in Nigeria. It is clear that the group is ahead of the FG.
We have 2 situations that make it more difficult:
1.The people still don't believe the group is behind the attacks
2. The federal govt seem clueless,plus it is fighting a psychological warfare. Firepower is not solving the problem.

With these problems i dont see an easy solution to this crises.
Recently in Kano and Maiduguri,people are loosing patience and getting angry at the law enforcement agents. Reports are coming in showing how the military are harrassing innocent people. A friend told me his girlfriends mum was asked to frog jump in front of her kids. They had to protest angrily before they were abused and let go without her doing the frog jump. With these kind of atrocities how do you expect sympathy or co-operation from the public?

Allah ya kashe mana wannan wutar.
So i guess people prefer the constant destruction and chaos caused by BH in the name of islamizin the country than co-operating with the government in fishin out the agents of destruction in our midst? There is no justification whatsoever in the war BokoHaram is waging against the government and the innocent people of Nigeria. Well we all say islam is a religion of peace, can we all come out and condemn the atrocities of BH rather than trying to justify and appreciate BH and giving what i will call "silly" reason why people are not co-operating with the government.

Mind you if we dont come openly against BH atrocities be rest assured it is the Northern region that will suffer d most. In a region already with chronic unemployment, illiteracy over d roof, high maternity rate, etc, activities of BH will drive out potential investment, businesses etc.forcing the region to go into comma, eventually becoming like somalia (may allah not allow that).   
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HUSNAA
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« Reply #6 on: February 08, 2012, 04:49:04 PM »

DB thanks for resurrecting the thread.

This whole BH saga is one of the most difficult issues to solve in Nigeria. It is clear that the group is ahead of the FG.
We have 2 situations that make it more difficult:
1.The people still don't believe the group is behind the attacks
2. The federal govt seem clueless,plus it is fighting a psychological warfare. Firepower is not solving the problem.

With these problems i dont see an easy solution to this crises.
Recently in Kano and Maiduguri,people are loosing patience and getting angry at the law enforcement agents. Reports are coming in showing how the military are harrassing innocent people. A friend told me his girlfriends mum was asked to frog jump in front of her kids. They had to protest angrily before they were abused and let go without her doing the frog jump. With these kind of atrocities how do you expect sympathy or co-operation from the public?

Allah ya kashe mana wannan wutar.
So i guess people prefer the constant destruction and chaos caused by BH in the name of islamizin the country than co-operating with the government in fishin out the agents of destruction in our midst? There is no justification whatsoever in the war BokoHaram is waging against the government and the innocent people of Nigeria. Well we all say islam is a religion of peace, can we all come out and condemn the atrocities of BH rather than trying to justify and appreciate BH and giving what i will call "silly" reason why people are not co-operating with the government.

Mind you if we dont come openly against BH atrocities be rest assured it is the Northern region that will suffer d most. In a region already with chronic unemployment, illiteracy over d roof, high maternity rate, etc, activities of BH will drive out potential investment, businesses etc.forcing the region to go into comma, eventually becoming like somalia (may allah not allow that).   

Another ignorant "know it all on Islam and muslims"  has joined the board. God Protect us!!! There have been plenty like you who have come on board with the same arrogant attitude and contempt for muslims. They left the board soundly whipped by their very ignorance  and arrogance. Take note and change your stance, otherwise find another forum to vent yr contempt.
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Ghafurallahi lana wa lakum
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« Reply #7 on: February 21, 2012, 03:29:06 PM »


Another ignorant "know it all on Islam and muslims"  has joined the board. God Protect us!!! There have been plenty like you who have come on board with the same arrogant attitude and contempt for muslims. They left the board soundly whipped by their very ignorance  and arrogance. Take note and change your stance, otherwise find another forum to vent yr contempt.
[/quote]

Well said Husnaa. Where are you? I missed you please. Kindly PM message me your number as I am desperately looking for you to talk on issues.
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o try and fail is atleast to learn. That will save one the inestimable loss of what might have been (positive or negative).
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« Reply #8 on: February 29, 2012, 09:41:35 AM »


Wow! I was also wondering the same thing though i wasnt opportuned to come online over the past few weeks. its really depressing the state of limbo in which the site has gone into, but this is just natural as many of us did predict that it will happen, partly due to development of other websites and partly due to the Nigerian underdeveloped condition, i mean only a microscopic few among the large populace are opportuned to have a stadious internet system and resources for a very long time, even though with the emergence of internet on mobile phones and other smart devices, its still not cutting it. Majority of the people have lost interest in the site. Allah ya kyauta.

So i guess people prefer the constant destruction and chaos caused by BH in the name of islamizin the country than co-operating with the government in fishin out the agents of destruction in our midst? There is no justification whatsoever in the war BokoHaram is waging against the government and the innocent people of Nigeria. Well we all say islam is a religion of peace, can we all come out and condemn the atrocities of BH rather than trying to justify and appreciate BH and giving what i will call "silly" reason why people are not co-operating with the government.

Mind you if we dont come openly against BH atrocities be rest assured it is the Northern region that will suffer d most. In a region already with chronic unemployment, illiteracy over d roof, high maternity rate, etc, activities of BH will drive out potential investment, businesses etc.forcing the region to go into comma, eventually becoming like Somalia (may Allah not allow that).   


On the issue at hand, kindly take a seat, keep an open mind and read up the thread again. I don’t think even if you walk the streets anywhere in the North in disguise you will ever hear any group of people conversing that they are in support of the BK activities more especially in a site like this, where the sole objective is for the intellectual minds to come together and proffer possible solutions for resolving these forsaken activities.
@Others. My only concerns are these, I am not in support of the BK activity whatsoever, but if really BK are fighting the modern day education system like they are called, why are they bombarding police stations and not schools and universities? Why are they killing both Muslims and Northerners alike? Why are they not in the southern part of Nigeria? Why are they still invisible despite the security measures? Why, despite the heavy military check points, bombs are still detonating within the inner walls of Kano? We really need to read between the lines here.

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« Reply #9 on: March 26, 2012, 10:01:20 AM »

Wielding Fire, Islamists Target Nigeria Schools - food for thought

MAIDUGURI, Nigeria — The teenager in the immaculate white robe stood in the ruins of what had been his school. There were no classrooms, no desks or chairs, no intact blackboards — there was, in fact, no longer any reason for him to be there.

Yet the teenager, Aruna Mustapha, and a friend had come to sign in anyway, just as they did every morning before the fire, expressing a hunger for education and a frustration with the insurgents bent on preventing it.

“We can’t stay at home any longer; we want to come to school, to learn,” explained Aruna, 16. “I’m fed up. I want to be in school.”

The insurgent violence stalking northern Nigeria has struck a long list of official targets, killing police and army officers, elected officials, high-ranking civil servants, United Nations workers and other perceived supporters of the Nigerian government.

Now it has an ominous new front: a war against schools.

Public and private schools here have been doused with gasoline at night and set on fire. Crude homemade bombs — soda bottles filled with gasoline — have been hurled at the bare-bones concrete classrooms Nigeria offers its children.

The simple yellow facades have been blackened and the plain desks melted to twisted pipes, leaving thousands of children without a place to learn, stranded at home and underfoot, while anxious parents plead with Nigerian authorities to come up with a contingency plan for their education.

Today, this dusty metropolis in northeastern Nigeria’s desert scrub is dotted with the burned-out shells of what were school buildings. The sun pours in as sheets of charred corrugated metal roof hang down into empty schoolrooms, clanging in the hot wind. In the sunny afternoons small children play in the ruins.

In recent weeks, at least eight schools have been firebombed, apparently the work of Boko Haram, the Islamist group waging a deadly war against the Nigerian government and suspected of cultivating links with Al Qaeda’s affiliates in the region. The group’s very name is a rallying cry against schools — “Boko” means “book” or “Western learning” in the Hausa language, and “haram” is Arabic for forbidden — but it has never gone after them to this degree before, analysts say.

“‘We are Boko Haram, and we will burn the school,’ ” the elderly watchman at Aruna’s school, the Abbaganaram Primary School, recounted the arsonists saying after they appeared out of the darkness, ordered him at gunpoint to lie down, doused the school with gasoline and set it on fire, lighting up the night sky.

A self-described spokesman for Boko Haram who frequently phones journalists in Maiduguri recently claimed responsibility for the school attacks. The spokesman, who calls himself Abul Qaqa, said they were in response to what he called a targeting of this city’s abundant open-air Islamic schools by authorities. Officials here have denied any such campaign. Indeed, young boys can be seen receiving Koranic lessons, untroubled, all over Maiduguri.

Around 2,600 students had gone to school at Abbaganaram, at the edge of a neighborhood considered a Boko Haram stronghold. Now, the quadrangle enclosing a sandy courtyard looks like a roofless war ruin. Fragments of a lesson, scrawled on what remains of a blackboard, can be glimpsed through a windowless opening.

A lone teacher, as eager to resume work as young Aruna, hung about in the school’s remains. “There is no public holiday. We are on duty,” said Babagana Kolo, who had taught primary school there. “We are supposed to be on duty.”

For several days after the attack in early March, students had come to be taught in the open air, under the hardy light-green neem trees in the courtyard, Mr. Kolo said. But he said the government had failed to provide materials, like chalk for a remaining blackboard, so the students had stopped coming.

“They bombed everywhere,” said Aliyu Adamu, a longtime teacher at Abbaganaram. “Everything. All the classes.”

Nobody has been killed in the school attacks, a notable exception amid a campaign of shadowy aims in which virtually anything associated with the Nigerian state is considered fair game. More than 900 people have been killed by Boko Haram in the last two years, according to Human Rights Watch.

Maiduguri, the birthplace of the Boko Haram insurgency, has become used to living under siege over the last two years. Fear and an army-enforced curfew empty the scruffy low-rise streets well before dark. Nervous public officials — prime assassination targets of the insurgents — avoid speaking the group’s name or blaming it. Army checkpoints are omnipresent. The soldiers, also a favorite target of snipers, are grim-faced and brusque.

“The Boko Haram are the ones controlling the state here,” said one of the lone human rights activists in Maiduguri, Maikaramba Sadiq of Nigeria’s Civil Liberties Organization. Residents fear that Boko Haram and its informants are everywhere.

“They are working 24 hours, looking, observing,” said Mr. Sadiq, who has been an intermediary between suspected Boko Haram members here and lawyers willing to represent them.

Yet the destruction of Maiduguri’s schools has bewildered and demoralized students, parents and teachers here in a way that the near-daily attacks, including one on a crowded market in February that killed 30, have not. The targeting of children, even indirectly, is seen as a new and sinister twist.

“I can’t even explain this,” said Musa Adam, a teacher at the Gwange III school, which endured a firebombing attempt but was not destroyed. “Is it an act of wickedness, or what? How can somebody destroy a school where children come to learn?”

Meanwhile, thousands of parents have seen one more prop supporting the illusion of normal life here destroyed.

“No one knows what this thing is all about,” said Musa Abakar, 39, father of two boys and a girl, ages 8 to 15, who attended the Abbaganaram Primary School before it was destroyed. “Burning schools, burning markets. How can one understand these things?”

Parents also wonder what to do about their marooned children since the Nigerian government has made no provision for them. The official in charge, Abba Ali Tijjani, the commissioner of Borno State schools, acknowledged as much in an interview.

“All our children are just staying at home,” said Isa Dauda, 27, who works in an open-air mattress workshop and has four children. “We don’t know what to do now. It’s more than a difficult situation.”

Opposite the Kulo Gumna Primary and Junior day school, where eight classrooms were destroyed in the heart of a Boko Haram-infiltrated neighborhood, Mamadou Youndusa, a barber cutting a child’s hair, lamented his own children’s newly imposed idleness.

He had children in both sections of the school. Now, “They are all at home. Which means a bleak future for them.”

A few of the classrooms at Kulo Gumna were untouched, but most of the students in them have not returned.

“They are afraid something will happen; that is why they are not coming back,” said a teacher, Fatouma Tujjani. Fewer than half of her 46 students have returned, she said. “They are just afraid.”

Elsewhere in Maiduguri, though, the will to resume schooling is overcoming fear, government lethargy and the absence of a plan. Early this month, several hundred children — laughing girls in blue-checked head scarves, and some white-shirted boys as well — showed up at the Abbaganaram ruins, preparing to trek a mile or so to another school that had agreed to take them in.

One of the older students, Adam Abagana, 18, expressed outrage at what had befallen his school.

“It’s an abomination. There is no justification for it,” he said. “We never thought the excesses of the gunmen would come down to burning schools.”

He added, “The only hope is, God has destined it.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/26/world/africa/in-nigeria-boko-haram-targets-schools.html?_r=1&pagewanted=2#
« Last Edit: March 26, 2012, 10:03:00 AM by Nesta » Logged
Nesta
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« Reply #10 on: April 15, 2012, 10:10:23 AM »


Another ignorant "know it all on Islam and muslims"  has joined the board. God Protect us!!! There have been plenty like you who have come on board with the same arrogant attitude and contempt for muslims. They left the board soundly whipped by their very ignorance  and arrogance. Take note and change your stance, otherwise find another forum to vent yr contempt.
Boko Haram - Economic Implications for Nigeria as more Northern youths relocating to the South in search of job and security
Boko Haram - Economic Implications for Nigeria
« Last Edit: April 15, 2012, 10:12:45 AM by Nesta » Logged
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