Author Topic: Shrinking Lake Chad  (Read 11537 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline lionger

  • Super Member
  • *****
  • Join Date: Jan 2003
  • Posts: 578
    • View Profile
Re: Shrinking Lake Chad
« Reply #15 on: January 18, 2007, 06:01:04 PM »
Sorry Dan Borno, I should have put some notations alongside the picture. Thankfully 'Aunty Husnaa' has obliged. Husnaa, I bow oh! That piece of yours was quite superb. I know we disagree on many issues, but I find your electic grasp of diff. fields of knowledge very impressive.

NewEte

  • Guest
Re: Shrinking Lake Chad
« Reply #16 on: January 18, 2007, 08:05:05 PM »
No kidding Lionger, me too. Her description of the images was expertly done like a true geographer.

NewEte

  • Guest
Re: Shrinking Lake Chad
« Reply #17 on: January 18, 2007, 08:13:38 PM »
But what's this"

Husnna's responde to Ete;
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Ete,
I am always skeptical whenever I get a commendation from you. I have been wondering if to accept your kind remarks in good faith or treat it with suspicion. Please Ete, help me out. Were you serious, or were you up to one of your tricks? I find it difficult to agree with you given your past anti islamic attitude (hellooooooooo, this is about Lake Chad)
So you see Ete, you are always siding with the west. Even when you don't side with them, in my mind you are still siding with them, so I am always suspicious.

Thanks.
Husnna!

Offline HUSNAA

  • Super Member
  • *****
  • Join Date: Dec 2005
  • Location: In Limbo
  • Posts: 2944
  • Gender: Female
  • Life's but the blink of an eye:spend it gratefully
    • View Profile
Re: Shrinking Lake Chad
« Reply #18 on: January 18, 2007, 08:36:43 PM »
 I'm speechless
Ghafurallahi lana wa lakum

Offline Dan-Borno

  • Super Member
  • *****
  • Join Date: Jan 2007
  • Location: Maiduguri
  • Posts: 2389
  • Gender: Male
  • EVERYTHING HAPPENS FOR A REASON
    • View Profile
    • Dan-Borno
Re: Shrinking Lake Chad
« Reply #19 on: January 18, 2007, 08:41:50 PM »
Ha Ete, you don start abi? pulling my Aunty's leg, be careful before I hire someone to descend on you.
Lake Chad is Shrinking, abi you don forget the topic, you know i am very close to the Lake.

Let me tell you something, even the banda fish (smoked) that is being brought from that corner has started to disappear.  Before, 10 - 15 years ago, the fish market (Tashan Baga) is just 100 meters from my house, i use to buy a carton of smoked fish for only N500.00, but now (forget about the inflation), a carton of smoked fish has risen to N5,000.00.  The worst of all, they are all gamba fish, i dont think they even contain the minerals they used to have before.

The Fish market is one of the biggest fish market in Africa, (I reliably gathered that the fish is the best in Africa) but now, go see the market.  Hardly, you see a full load of truck going south, as against before, where about 5 - 10 trucks of loaded banda fish trooping down south.

One disgusting issue is that neither my State Government (Borno) nor any neighbouring benefitting state is trying to address this issue.  Could you believe me that over 15 - 25 thousand people are depending on this business of fishing?

My people, you need to go there and see wonders for your eyes, the first time I was on this Lake, to Allah who created me, i didnt believe i am in Nigeria, because we drove on the boat non-stop for 3 hours on the lake at a minimum speed of 90 - 100 kmph.

Another issue I will like you to note is that, these guys fishing on this lake, spend a whole six month without coming out of the water, they dont even come to the river bank.  After they have finished catching the fish, they will stay very far from the river bank, special agents will now drive their boat to about 5 kilometers, it is on top of that water that the fish will be bought by the agents, while the retailers are waiting by the river bank.

So on and so on, the rest untill I host you in Borno, I am tire of writing.
"My mama always used to tell me: 'If you can't find somethin' to live for, you best find somethin' to die for" - Tupak

NewEte

  • Guest
Re: Shrinking Lake Chad
« Reply #20 on: January 19, 2007, 03:36:57 PM »
Dan Borno, so you like fish like this fa? Well, I am an angler myself and I fish quite a bit. There is a canal the runs behind my backyard and into a big lake. Most of my neighbors have pantoon or bass fishing boats, and so we often go out to the lake to fish for bass or trout. Unlike you Dan Borno, I am not so crazy about smoked fish. I usually fillet the fish and put it on a grill. Season it with All Purpose seasoning, onion powder, black pepper, sea salt, peppercorn medly and garlic. Serve it with salad or boiled potatoes with spices, and Dang!!!!!! you 'll bite your fingers. Much better and healthier than cooking all that fish in soup or frying it in oil.

I know you are talking about large scale commercial fishing, and not recreational like I do. But even then, there are rules we have to go by because of state and federal conservation laws. If you fish indescriminately, you can effectively reduce the fish population in an area. Same goes for hunting. The laws requires ordinary recreational anglers like myself to have fishing licenses for either fresh water or salt water. I have both because I'm either usually at the lake or a coastline town with a beach. The other thing is there are further regulations regarding size of fish you can catch. The fish you catch no matter how big must meet the required length established by law before you can keep it. So what we do mostly is keep a measuring chart, and if the fish I catch for instance does not measure, I release it back into the water. Most people do the same, and this helps conservation or else, there will be no fish left in most creeks or ponds.

Similar laws apply to commercial fishing. Fishing industry is seriously regulated. It is even worse for Crab fishermen because they have a month or so in six months to go out to sea to cast their pods for giant crabs, and it is a demanding job. It pays well though if you make it back in one piece. So there are rules that need to be followed and enforced. When fishing trawleys are out in the sea, the coast guard routinely board the boats to either do a full inspection of the boat and check to see that all the papers, permits, etc are in order. They also check to make sure the crew is in compliance of applicable fishing laws. Any violation, and the penalty can be really stiff.

You made a point that some fishing vessels camp out at sea for weeks and even engage in commerce right there at sea rather than return to port. That cannot be good for business. Any successful fishing community needs to have a thriving and burstling port or marina. The marina needs to be busy with both retail and whole buyers making deals, buying, and moving fish here and there. This is what helps the economy of that port town thrive. But when business transaction are now moved away from the port, and most of the fish is sold to rackets at sea, what is left when the vessel finally berths at port? Nothing but diminished activity. This hurts business, and this is where a responsible government steps in so the local economy does not crumble because of illegal practises.

The other thing i want to point (and I see this a lot here) out is that it would make better sense if communities began fish farm businesses. This will require hiring marine experts and start up cost may be significant, but it is the right thing to do. Fish farming is a smart conservative idea. Indivduals like you Dan Borno can do this if you live out in the country and have some land by your home. In this case, you will have a fish pond. It could be cold or warm water pond. You can then stock this pond with fishinglings. Warmwater species of fish have an advantage over trout in the farm pond situation because they can reproduce. I would recommend largemouth bass/ bluegill combination or bass/ golden shiner combination. Some fishes like catfish and bullheads are bottom feeders and can over populate. They can also muddy your pond, but it all comes down to your preference.

I think this is an alternative to the shrinking marine life in your area. Dan Borno, when you invite me to Borno, I would take my fishing gadgets along. Who knows, Nigerian fishes may be too smart bite our bait. So, when you have time invite me, and we can go take a second look at this situation. Don't invite Husnna please. she may be causing confusion there and the people may kick us out of the market for nothing.  ;D

Offline Dan-Borno

  • Super Member
  • *****
  • Join Date: Jan 2007
  • Location: Maiduguri
  • Posts: 2389
  • Gender: Male
  • EVERYTHING HAPPENS FOR A REASON
    • View Profile
    • Dan-Borno
Re: Shrinking Lake Chad
« Reply #21 on: January 19, 2007, 05:27:52 PM »
 ;D
"My mama always used to tell me: 'If you can't find somethin' to live for, you best find somethin' to die for" - Tupak

Offline HUSNAA

  • Super Member
  • *****
  • Join Date: Dec 2005
  • Location: In Limbo
  • Posts: 2944
  • Gender: Female
  • Life's but the blink of an eye:spend it gratefully
    • View Profile
Re: Shrinking Lake Chad
« Reply #22 on: January 19, 2007, 10:58:55 PM »
Don't invite Husnna please. she may be causing confusion there and the people may kick us out of the market for nothing.  ;D

Ahem..(Clearing throat) I heard that!!!.
Ghafurallahi lana wa lakum

NewEte

  • Guest
Re: Shrinking Lake Chad
« Reply #23 on: January 21, 2007, 04:40:58 AM »
I thought this Dan Borno was interested in fishing. He had no comment at all about my post on fishing. Now, I am disappointed. I thought I found someone here that shares a passion in fishing. Dan Borno, you are the one that adviced me to discuss other things except religious issues. I took your advice and did that, and what was your response? Nothing! Thank you Sir.

Offline HUSNAA

  • Super Member
  • *****
  • Join Date: Dec 2005
  • Location: In Limbo
  • Posts: 2944
  • Gender: Female
  • Life's but the blink of an eye:spend it gratefully
    • View Profile
Re: Shrinking Lake Chad
« Reply #24 on: January 21, 2007, 08:16:01 PM »
Lol Ete!! Your kind of fishing is a leisurely activity. I dont think its quite the same as what happens on the lake Chad. In  any case, I dont think Dan Borno is a fisherman. He may have been on the lake and the fishmarket and bought the fish, but that didnt make it his livelihood.

The sort of fishing that goes on is hardly the type that can be described as a hobby. Many do it for monetary gains. Large fishing nets  and some kind of baskets  called dumba (i think) are  used. The baskets are placed upside down in rows inside the water and used to trap the fish. There are, or used to be many types of fish caught. But the ones I know are the mudfish or catfish (I believe) and tilapia. The fish need to be smoked as a preservative measure against spoiling as the catch has to be exported out of the region. A lot of ppl use corn cobs as fuel.  Infact corn cobs are the main fuel source in some of these villages. However, some ppl have been known to use dried dung  to smoke the fish.

Fishing in the Nigerian part of the lake has stopped yielding significant dividends. The fish population is so depleted and at the same time the fish themselves are small. Nevertheless the fishermen net them in like that. But there is a law against catching young fish   and fines are usually imposed on the fishermen caught fishing illegally like that. But of course hardly anyone is ever caught. The Cameroonian part of the lake is more lucrative and many of the fish cargo that eventually finds its way to the Nigerian markets comes from Cameroon.

Life on the lake is very tough. There are sand dune islands which have become exposed when the lake level dropped. These dune islands have fertile soils at the interface of dune and water. Farmers and fisher men have settled on these islands. The fishermen fish   during the flooding season. When the flood receeds in the dry season, the farmers cultivate the extremely fertile soils. Some famous dune islands are Darak, which was in the news a lot last year (or the year before last), as it was one of the islands handed over to Cameroon. (Not part of the bakkassi peninsular). Another one is Duguri which I think is still a part of Nigeria. Many ppl from diverse ethnic backgrounds have made these islands their homes and  live amicably with each other. As a result, thriving commercial hubs have sprung up in these island villages.

In the preceding years, the military presence in these islands was palpable. Soldiers were a daily part of life. I remember being told I should hide my camera from them and on being stopped by one soldier, our stupid guide when asked what our bizness there was said, oh they are only taking pictures!! (dumbass lol!!)
 

Mosquitoes are what make life almost unbearable in these islands. On average, there must be at least 100 mosquitoes per square inch of skin!! I spent two days on a very tiny island there. So tiny you'd miss it on a map and I must have slapped myself silly during the two days I was there. It was an experience which  I am still undecided about the repeat of... but who knows?
« Last Edit: January 21, 2007, 08:36:49 PM by HUSNAA »
Ghafurallahi lana wa lakum

Offline sdanyaro

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Join Date: Sep 2001
  • Location: Kano, Nigeria.
  • Posts: 321
    • View Profile
    • http://www.dandali.com
Re: Shrinking Lake Chad
« Reply #25 on: January 21, 2007, 09:23:44 PM »
HUSNAA what a beautiful exposť on the great Lake Chad, and this brings back memories for me about the lake and the whole area as I spent a whole year in New Marte as a then young Soil Scientist working with the Lake Chad Basin Authority.

Quote
Mosquitoes are what make life almost unbearable...
Yes you can say that again... it was common at that time in that place that Mosquitoes can kill livestock such as horses and donkeys overnight just by the shear numbers of the Mosquitoes that can bite the skin inside the nostrils on these animals and that was why it was very common to see very large huts build that housed not only people but their livestock overnight as well.

Another characteristics of the area, was the Clay soil and a very short raining season. Clay soils hold water for an extended period of time. You will also notice that not much is grown during the rainy period but they grow a dwarf variety of sorghum that takes advantage of the residual moisture from the clay soils...

Oh... Scorpions were also very plentiful...

Offline HUSNAA

  • Super Member
  • *****
  • Join Date: Dec 2005
  • Location: In Limbo
  • Posts: 2944
  • Gender: Female
  • Life's but the blink of an eye:spend it gratefully
    • View Profile
Re: Shrinking Lake Chad
« Reply #26 on: January 22, 2007, 06:52:47 AM »
I've been to Marte also. Old Marte, where the local govt hq is. The mention of that name just brings back wonderful memories for me especially of the characters I have met there. Lol I had a great time there, so full of adventure. Who can forget the clays especially in the rainy season. We were coming back in our jallopy old 4 wheel drive in May of 2004 from the lake shores and driving along the krenowa canal. We had to hurry up and make it before nightfall because our headlamps were a touch and go affair, also  clouds had bunched up in the skies above us and it was threatening to rain and our guide (another one not the dumbass) had told us that if we got caught up in the rain, it would be virtually impossible to move because of the mud. Lo and behold, as we approached the town of Krenowa, it started to rain. But as the road was tarred, we were OK, but we still had a long way to go from where we were stationed at the LG secretariat. We ran into problems the moment we left the tarred road and hit the clay soil.  At first we were able to rev the old jeep and it was skating along the wet silky clay and the driver a colleague of mine was doing all he could to stay on course, while my sister and I, fidgetted in the backseat. It had become pitch black as well and we were not sure if we had a torchlight with us or not. There was a lot of debris strewn on the ground. There were torn off branches of a particular thorn shrub that were lying all over
the road. Every time we came across one, my colleague slowed down, the guide got out and removed the thorn shrub out of the way.
If we dared drive over the shrub, we'd have a flat tyre in seconds. We already had one flat tyre at the back jacked up in the trunk so we didnt have a spare. So we had to be very careful.
One time we slowed down because we had to remove a thorn branch  on a road, on both sides of which were  ditches, (those water carrying canals). Although the road was wide, the clay was so wet and smooth that the tyres had lost all traction and we were skating all over the mud. My greatest fear was that we would eventually end up in one of the canals.  The moment we slowed down, the engine gave out momentarily. When it was eventually started, we found that we had revved ourselves deeply into the mud and the more the engine was revved, the greater the mud churned out and the deeper we sank into it. We all came out and started heaving and pushing. I cant remember how we got out of that jam. We eventually got the jeep out of the mud with the skill of the local guide, then we piled back into it, and drove at a snail's pace while all the time skidding on the mud. There was not a soul or dwelling to be seen for miles and miles. Everything was so eerily quiet which was the norm at night in that part of the world. I think it took us over three hours to cover the journey. By the time we reached the secretariat, it was well past 11:00 PM. I for one never thought we would make it.

Scorpions lol!! You havent mentioned the snakes... I think I saw more snakes there than I have ever seen in my life!
« Last Edit: January 22, 2007, 07:00:55 AM by HUSNAA »
Ghafurallahi lana wa lakum

Offline Dan-Borno

  • Super Member
  • *****
  • Join Date: Jan 2007
  • Location: Maiduguri
  • Posts: 2389
  • Gender: Male
  • EVERYTHING HAPPENS FOR A REASON
    • View Profile
    • Dan-Borno
Re: Shrinking Lake Chad
« Reply #27 on: January 22, 2007, 08:44:26 AM »
Hey, where is Ete (Both the New and Old), Do I have to answer your question? To me Husna Danyaro have done justice to your question, infact they have even go further to tell us of their adventures in that part of my state. 

Believe every things they told you, they are really first class inhabitant of that area.  Even myself that stays in the capital city have never experienced such.

A gaisheku mutan jiya.

"My mama always used to tell me: 'If you can't find somethin' to live for, you best find somethin' to die for" - Tupak

Offline sdanyaro

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Join Date: Sep 2001
  • Location: Kano, Nigeria.
  • Posts: 321
    • View Profile
    • http://www.dandali.com
Re: Shrinking Lake Chad
« Reply #28 on: January 22, 2007, 09:54:56 PM »
Husna --- Interesting…
Quote
May of 2004
– My experience with that area was from 1984 to 1985, what about 20 years? Maybe that is how much older I am to you…

Yes whenever it rains, it is usually preceded with big and life fearing activities of supernatural scale. The winds and dust preceding the rains were merciless to anything living or non-living that it finds on that flat lands. I think you were lucky that the vehicle was not toppled over before it rains or maybe because you were driving in and around the canal that shielded you from the fiercest winds. Usually the dust will be so thick that you will not be able to see the palm of your hands in the middle of the day. People and animals around there know very well to take deep and good cover when they sense an impending and approaching rain.

The sense of isolation and loneliness was complete. In those days when I go out running, I could run for 5 miles without seeing anybody. You really do get in touch with your inner self and I think that whole experience help in making me the loner that I have been since then… I am comfortable being alone.

Snakes? Yeah snakes were meat… I tell you the Scorpions were more of a nuisance than the snakes. The scorpions were as plentiful as ants, they were everywhere. In the yard, you could find them in the closets, on the wall of the room, on bed and on the floor. You have to make sure that you check everywhere, your shoes and clothes before you put them on, the bed sheets before you lay down on the bed… one woman did not remember to check her “rigar nono”… well needless to say, she had to be rushed to a health center…

Now the peoples and foods of that area is another topic all together...
… I could write a book… I am surprise that I can still remember these things after about 20 years.

Dan-Borno, you have to check that part of your state and let us know. btw, have you been around Gambaru Ngala, Nguru or Biu parts of Borno or are you a just a Maiduguri kind of guy? I am thinking maybe we should start a nother forum under state, for Borno and Yobe States?
« Last Edit: January 22, 2007, 10:10:00 PM by sdanyaro »

 


Powered by EzPortal