Author Topic: Paradigm Shift in the Historiography of the Hausa  (Read 5194 times)

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Offline Abdalla

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Paradigm Shift in the Historiography of the Hausa
« on: November 09, 2009, 07:41:32 PM »
Jama', Sallama

I am not sure if those resident in Nigeria noticed it, but on Saturday 31st October 2009, there was a major paradigm shift in the historiography of the Hausa. This shift was brought about by a new Royal Charter from the kingdom of Daura, in northern Nigeria.
 
On that historic day, His Highness, the Emir of Daura Alhaji Faruk Umar Faruk appointed the first ever Walin Hausa, Alhaji Umar Faruk Abdullahi. In the process of the appointment, His Highness issued a new Royal Charter in which he re-designated the historic references to the Hausa people in history. The traditional reference clusters of Hausa Bakwai and Banza Bakwai have been abolished. It is now Hausa Bakwai and 'Yan Uwa Bakwai. The Hausa Bakwai (claimed to be the "original" Hausa States) are Daura, Katsina, Kano, Rano, Gobir, Zaria and Garun Gabas (near present day Auyo in Jigawa State). The 'Yan Uwa Bakwai (formerly Banza Bakwai, or "fake-Hausa States") are Zamfara, Kebbi, Yawuri, Ilorin, Nupe, Gwari and KWararrafa. His Highness emphasized that he made the appointment of Walin Hausa in full consultation with the rulers of the 14 Hausa states - further reaffirming the "'yan uwaness" of all the 14.
 
There are of course historians who never accepted even with a pinch of salt the "Banza Bakwai" as being vassal states of the Hausa. The Hausaness of Banza Bakwai was really more by association, than genetic or linguistic factors. And even then, one would have found it difficult to claim that Zamfarawa are not really Hausa (and they are not!).
 
The new Royal Charter would mean that history books would have to be re-written to reflect a new Hausa history that has become not only politically correct, but also increasingly aware of a more multicultural configuration of contemporary Hausa social realities. Thus while still accepting a non-Hausa is non-Hausa, nevertheless he is a "brother" -- someone to cherish. I like it. My only modification of His Highness' charter would have been to include Garun Gabas in the 'Yan Uwa Bakwai to make them 'Yan Uwa Takwas (and Hausa Shida), for Garun Gabas does not historiographically belong to Hausa Bakwai. It was added by the authors of the Girgam (the Hausa Chronicle).
 
The full details are in Aminiya and Hausa Leadership of 6th November 2009. Get them. They are historical masterpieces -- and it is not everyday that one gets to see history written. I have scanned the Aminiya portion of the story and have a attached it to this post.
 
Long Live the King! Long Live 'Yan Uwa Bakwai! Long Live Hausa Bakwai!

Abdalla

Offline gogannaka

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Re: Paradigm Shift in the Historiography of the Hausa
« Reply #1 on: November 10, 2009, 03:05:40 PM »
Nice one.
The attachment isn't showing.
Surely after suffering comes enjoyment

Offline Abdalla

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Re: Paradigm Shift in the Historiography of the Hausa
« Reply #2 on: November 10, 2009, 09:35:56 PM »
Salisu has just copied the image -- and HE was having difficulties in posting it (plus a slow connection). But he is going to upload it soon.

Abdalla

Offline Muhsin

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Re: Paradigm Shift in the Historiography of the Hausa
« Reply #3 on: November 11, 2009, 12:16:37 PM »
Salam,

I almost always kinda regard this name Banza Bakwai as absurd. Why "Banza"? Thus I am stunned at the current development.

A little bit off-topic: Do these Bakwai stuff really originated from Bayajidda? I asked this question considering that the story of Bayajidda is being severely critisized, debunked and refuted by numerous scholars of this era. Some even conclude that it's simply a "tarihihi"--a myth, that has never happened. What Prof. Abdallah get to say on that? And many thanks for the (yet) response.

Muhsin
Get to know [and remember] Allah in prosperity & He will know  [and remember] you in adversity.

Offline Abdalla

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Re: Paradigm Shift in the Historiography of the Hausa
« Reply #4 on: November 14, 2009, 12:45:20 AM »
Muhsin

"Banza" in the Hausa historical context simply meant "not-Hausa", but "muna Hausa"; i.e. absorbed Hausa.

I never believed in the Bayajida stuff -- there were so many contradictions to make it credible. What annoys me, though, is how historians always painted Bayida as the "founder of Hausa people" An example of such rubbish is given athttp://www.uiowa.edu/~africart/toc/people/Hausa.html. This is utter and absurd rubbish -- the Hausas are negroid, Bayida was supposed to be an Arab. He arrived in Daura, met some people there, married a Queen -- so clearly there WERE people when he came. But there is nothing in the histories of Baghdad to indicate such a person existed.

But his legend provides a nice identity focus for the RULING houses of the Hausa kindgdoms, and for lack of anything better, we hang on to it. It makes a nice story!

Abdalla

Offline Muhsin

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Re: Paradigm Shift in the Historiography of the Hausa
« Reply #5 on: November 17, 2009, 04:07:05 PM »
Salam,

Thanks Professor for the reply. That tells me my "quest" makes sense. lol :)

In what Hausa does the word Banza means that? In the one I know "Banza" means foolish/foolishness. Thus I was under an impression; and after following the myth of Bayajidda, that the nomenclature (i.e. Hausa Bakwai) had its genesis from the way in which their fore-father sired them out--after jeopardizing, disowning, divorcing; and dumping the daughter of Kameni King en-route to Daura.
Get to know [and remember] Allah in prosperity & He will know  [and remember] you in adversity.

 


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