Author Topic: Ife Massacre II  (Read 27322 times)

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Offline Muhsin

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Ife Massacre II
« on: March 13, 2017, 06:17:08 PM »
Sometime ago, a video of a Brazilian girl being attacked and torched by a mob went viral. I mistakenly watched it. I profusely regretted doing that, for it kept on hunting me like a scene from a horror film in my childhood.

Again, when the South African xenophobic attacks on Nigerians resurged last month, another video of a guy being shot several times by some attackers went viral. In my curiosity to verify the news of the attacks, I grudgingly watched it. Wallahi the incident still startles me.

And now, the #IfeMassacre occurred. I wrote about the bloodshed on Facebook and Twitter, and talked about it with many people for it's disappointing, disheartening and despairing. Yet I did not watch the video until much later - yesterday, I think. I couldn't help it, for I felt the urge to 'witness' what transpired over there, on the people I care much about, and on whose calamity I write and talk. I felt, and still feel, numbed after watching it. I had nightmare over it. The scene of human beings being on fire and chased like worst of animals is so barbaric, unsettling and unimaginable. Their crime is only being Hausawa! Innaalillaahi wa innaa ilaihi raaji'uun!

All said, I have read some stupidest of God's creations asking us what have we said when the so-called Fulani herdsmen killed people in Southern Kaduna. Another quarried me, when I tweeted the President about it, what did the President say about the same Kaduna killings? Can people be that dumber?

Supposed I or the President haven't said anything, and that's wrong; thus, what's wrong in saying something about #IfeMassacre? Wallahi if that video doesn't move anyone who watches it, one should ask oneself about his/her humanity. I am of the opinion that even the perpetrators would feel for their preys if they later watch the clip.

The Brazilian girl and the purported Nigerian in South Africa were not Hausas, or Muslims. They are humans. But what befell them pulled me down, WALLAHI. However, when some unfeeling fellow Nigerians, blacks, probably Muslims find it undoable or difficult to sympathise and empathise with their fellows is simply beyond my comprehension.

RIP, Humanity. RIP, Common Sense. RIP, One Nigeria.

Muhsin Ibrahim
« Last Edit: March 13, 2017, 06:27:28 PM by Muhsin »
Get to know [and remember] Allah in prosperity & He will know  [and remember] you in adversity.

 


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