Author Topic: What will you change about Nigeria?  (Read 30528 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Dave_McEwan_Hill

  • Super Member
  • *****
  • Join Date: Jun 2003
  • Location: Argyll, Scotland
  • Posts: 514
  • Gender: Male
    • View Profile
Re: What will you change about Nigeria?
« Reply #15 on: June 02, 2010, 09:00:19 PM »
The responses here are both depressing and encouraging at the same time.
Depressing  because Nigeria is indeed recognised worldwide as the world's most corrupt country and encouraging because so may are now able to admit this and recognise it is not the fault of anybody else but Nigerians.

They go to mosque on  Friday
They go to church on a Sunday
The thieves that are stealing the future from Nigeria's people.
What is worse is the admiration the big man thief is given by those around him.
You can add hypocrisy to corruption as the twin ills that beset Nigeria.

I cannot blame the small guys for grabbing what they can. After all, he sees his "government" stealing millions all the time and getting away with.
I do not believe that Nigerians are any worse as people than anybody else in the world. But you cannot have an incorrupt society when the police force is corrupt and useless, when the courts are completely open to interference and when any big man can buy any sort of judgement he wants.
Nigeria probably needs to import Police Chiefs from other places if any attempt is to be made to start a war against corruption.
When a policeman can charge a Governor you have system that is working.
 
maigemu

Offline nasr19

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Join Date: Jul 2009
  • Posts: 48
    • View Profile
Re: What will you change about Nigeria?
« Reply #16 on: June 02, 2010, 10:04:24 PM »
Thanks gentlemen. Good topic, wonderful contributions. As usual, there is never a shortage of ideas on what is wrong with our country or the way forward.  Problem is, we talk too much. At the end of all the discussions and brilliant analyses, our job is done and the decay continues... How to break this jinx, this vicious cycle that has seen us regressing these past 50 years? Action, any action other than just talk.

Here is one idea: There seems to be a consensus that corruption is at the root of our problems. Lets sponsor a whistle blower bill in the National Assembly as one weapon to fight it. Let this bill guarantee protection/anonymity. Let it provide motivation in the form of some percentage of recovered loot.  Surely someone must know how we can get started on this right away!  (and if something like this already exist, lets publicize it, or, if need be, amend it to be more effective)

Offline Suleman

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Join Date: May 2007
  • Posts: 45
    • View Profile
Re: What will you change about Nigeria?
« Reply #17 on: June 03, 2010, 11:23:53 AM »
This is getting more encouraging to say the least. Nasr, There is indeed a whistleblower bill pending in the NASS as I found out from a simple google search (how we lived before google beats me). I have attached a link to the report of the project that gave birth to the draft bill.
I do agree with you that actions need to come out from the "brilliant analysis" but let me also add that talking about is a step in the right direction as Dave put it. We are constantly reminding one another that, indeed we do not approve of the 'goings on'. Remember a hadith of the prophet (SAW) that says, ' who ever amonst you saw an ill (wrongdoing), then he should correct it with his hands, if that is not possible, then with his tongue and if that is not possible, then correct it in his heart, and that is the weakest of iman'. I believe by discussing the issue, we are a step above the weakest, but that should'nt deter us from aspiring for the strongest.

http://www.partnershipfortransparency.info/uploads/completed%20projects/nigeria_report.htm

Offline gogannaka

  • Global Moderator
  • Super Member
  • *****
  • Join Date: May 2003
  • Location: Kano
  • Posts: 3693
  • Gender: Male
    • View Profile
Re: What will you change about Nigeria?
« Reply #18 on: June 03, 2010, 04:58:01 PM »
Wouldn't the bill be a replication of the EFCC and ICPC acts?

The power of fighting corruption lies in the head of the government. If the president is keen on fighting corruption there's no doubt the effect will be great.
But the thing is, usually the way presidents come to power itself is corrupt.
Corruption has to be eliminated along with gross indiscipline before the country moves forward.
Surely after suffering comes enjoyment

Offline Dave_McEwan_Hill

  • Super Member
  • *****
  • Join Date: Jun 2003
  • Location: Argyll, Scotland
  • Posts: 514
  • Gender: Male
    • View Profile
Re: What will you change about Nigeria?
« Reply #19 on: June 03, 2010, 05:25:30 PM »
Gogannaka is right. The problem has to be solved right from the top.

In historical terms the fact that Nigeria found itself with huge oil wealth has turned out to be a curse rather than a blessing. While other emerging societies across the world have had to do things right and had to manufacture in factories and had to do their agriculture right  in order to improve as a society Nigeria found itself with easy money. One of your staple foods - rice - is imported because of this easy money. People have abandoned doing agriculture because of this easy money. Every body at every level wants a bit of this easy money. You don't have to work. You just have to know the right people. Or get a "contract" to split with a corrupt official. I could go on and on. Yet I have met many Nigerians who were the best workers I ever knew. But why work for useless wages when your brother has a contract and is rich doing nothing.

And when the oil runs out. What then? Will Nigeria have any roads left by then? 
maigemu

Offline Suleman

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Join Date: May 2007
  • Posts: 45
    • View Profile
Re: What will you change about Nigeria?
« Reply #20 on: June 04, 2010, 12:33:04 PM »
Wouldn't the bill be a replication of the EFCC and ICPC acts?

The power of fighting corruption lies in the head of the government. If the president is keen on fighting corruption there's no doubt the effect will be great.
But the thing is, usually the way presidents come to power itself is corrupt.
Corruption has to be eliminated along with gross indiscipline before the country moves forward.

The bill is for the protection of whistleblowers. It is comlpletely different, albeit complementary, to the acts of the EFCC and ICPC. A whistleblower is any member of the public who has evidence of an act of corruption going on and would like to expose it. The bill is intended to provide for that persons protection, by the Law. Many people are afraid of the repercurssions of exposing corrupt practices, which makes the perpetraitors more daring in their acts.
You have said it yourself, fighting corruption is mainly the resolve of the government as they are best placed to commit resources to achieve that, but "exposing" corruption should be every ones' responsibilty, nevertheless, the whistleblower should not be doing so at his own risk so to speak.

Offline lionger

  • Super Member
  • *****
  • Join Date: Jan 2003
  • Posts: 578
    • View Profile
Re: What will you change about Nigeria?
« Reply #21 on: June 04, 2010, 04:56:58 PM »
The creation of the EFCC, ICPC and the whistleblower protection bill are all steps in the right direction. (We hardly have a 'whistleblower' culture in Nigeria, but we gotta start somewhere. That is part of our problem anyways).

Another suggestion is that the government decide on a sound economic development program and hold fast to it for a significant period of time(> 10 years). Things take time to work. Part of our problem is that we have simply failed to commit to economic policies, let alone implementing them properly. Every new government heralds their magic formula, does barely anything with it and then we find ourselves still in square one with the next government. Witness Yar'Adua's seven point agenda - where's the beef? It is because things like this that Nigerians have become some of the most cynical people on the face of the earth.

I have already talked about trimming our unnecessarily cumbersome government structure, but sadly this will probably never happen in Nigeria. But in any case the key to progess in Nigeria as others have mentioned is sound visionary leadership. How such leaders will get in there I don't know, but it will have to happen. Otherwise, the only other recourse I see is cataclysmic destruction that will wipe the entire Nigerian slate clean, upon which a more sober people can begin to build a better society.

Offline ummutameem

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Join Date: Nov 2007
  • Posts: 425
  • Gender: Female
    • View Profile
Re: What will you change about Nigeria?
« Reply #22 on: June 05, 2010, 08:14:22 AM »
this is very interesting, i like d whistle blower concept, it will cause a lot of heart ache but if we are determined it ll work in years to come but not immediately.

you see our problem is nothing works like it should in nija, its like it has a disease dat has attacked all her organs, major n minor, n they are failing one after d other til we have total anarchy! Allah help us.

let me give an example of how whistle blowing ll leave one high n dry, and oh yeah very hungry. so i work this committee in an organisation dat adminters justice, someone whistle blows on an officer dat abused his office. this officer comes before d committee, n wat do u know, hes d cousin to our ceo, so he was reprimanded verbally, oh i was so impressed wit how d chairman talked to dat guy, officer leaves, n its time for d committee to write its recommendation, d same chairman now turns n says ok, how do we pay up this debt, as he is d ceo's cousin, we hav to be careful, so we ask d finance dept to foot d bill. i was flabbershocked! so just because hes related to smone high up he goes away wit embezzlement n tax payers money is going to be used to support his habit.

in dis case if i whistle blow on d committee, who listens to me? these guys are d creme of dat org., they ll set up a fresh committee to deal wit me for devulging previleged info n i ll be sacked, mind u dats wat happened eventually, i didnt whistle blow but i think my face is too expressive, they saw exactly how i was feeling, i think they got tired of my judgemental attitude.

however i feel as we are tackling these problems from d top we should also consider our schools, have a better system, teach nigerian history n nationalism, instill d love of d country in our youth, its very important!!!! so dat somehow d two ll meet in d middle n d country ll be a whole lot better for all, it ll not be perfect but it will be more civilised n humane

Offline gogannaka

  • Global Moderator
  • Super Member
  • *****
  • Join Date: May 2003
  • Location: Kano
  • Posts: 3693
  • Gender: Male
    • View Profile
Re: What will you change about Nigeria?
« Reply #23 on: June 05, 2010, 01:08:20 PM »
Instilling the love of the country and nationalism is important.
Last week i was watching the NTA, they had organized a national science exhibition where children from primary and secondary schools showcased different scientific and engineering inventions.
The event was hosted by the minister of state for information and the DG of the NTA.
It was quite interesting,however, towards the end of the program (i didn't really watch the full program) i heard the MC saying something like 'children from the south-west please exchange your gifts with children from the north-east. Those from north central exchange your gifts with those from the south east' and so forth.
I was sad. The primary school pupils as young as they are have been divided already.
I remember when we were in primary school i didn't know any north east or north central. Infact i didn't know any north. I only knew that Lagos was very far and close to the ocean. All i knew was Nigeria. But here was a federal minister and the top helmsman of the National TV sectionalising and regionalising young children at this tender age.

Another disturbing instance happened a month ago. We had some new neighbors that moved in recently. They have this cute little girl called favour. She is around 5years and she loves coming to our house to play with the kids (her age mates). One day she was happily playing and she heard us speaking hausa. She asked 'are you people hausa' we said yes. She squeked 'JESUS' and she left the house.
This shows you how divided we already are. A 5 year old already judging people according to their tribe.
My niece(who is also Favour's friend) also came back from school when yar'adua died and was sad. I asked her why she was sad and she said her friends were rejoicing over his death. She said they were happy because a christian was now president. She said now she hates Christians because they rejoice if people die. I had a hard time convincing her that not all Christians are like that.

So here we are spending N10billion celebrating 50years of unity when the foundations are already corrupted, tribalized and divided between Islam and Christianity.
God help us.
Surely after suffering comes enjoyment

Offline ummutameem

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Join Date: Nov 2007
  • Posts: 425
  • Gender: Female
    • View Profile
Re: What will you change about Nigeria?
« Reply #24 on: June 05, 2010, 10:26:27 PM »
ggnk that is touching, it really is sad, and i can attest to those incidences, being a muslim northerner dat just moved to the south, it is a real eye opener for me on how divided nigeria is, and for us to move this country successfully forward we have to resolve those issue.

 if we are going to remain one nigeria then we ll all hav to work towards it, if its not going to work then its beta to divide while the going is still good, because we are harbouring a lot of hatred and anger, on both ethnic and religious sides, we do not want a situation where we will implode and explode at dsame time! mega catastrophe by name civil war! subhanallah, Allah ya kare!

Offline ummutameem

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Join Date: Nov 2007
  • Posts: 425
  • Gender: Female
    • View Profile
Re: What will you change about Nigeria?
« Reply #25 on: June 10, 2010, 12:53:04 PM »
i just read an article by obi ezekwesili in thisday, saying dat prior to d recent economic recession nigeria n africa in general was experiencing an economic growth, may be if one looks too hard one may shoot holes in ha analysis, which is actually world bank's analysis, but i think half bread is beta than non, that we are progressing, even at a snail's pace, is positive, it gives hope!

Offline Suleman

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Join Date: May 2007
  • Posts: 45
    • View Profile
Re: What will you change about Nigeria?
« Reply #26 on: June 10, 2010, 01:44:58 PM »
i just read an article by obi ezekwesili in thisday, saying dat prior to d recent economic recession nigeria n africa in general was experiencing an economic growth, may be if one looks too hard one may shoot holes in ha analysis, which is actually world bank's analysis, but i think half bread is beta than non, that we are progressing, even at a snail's pace, is positive, it gives hope!

Ironically, we just finished a presentation which suggests that while the GDPs of the developed nations is going to remain relativley flat for the next 3 years, that of Africa and the emerging Asian economies will see an astronomical growth within the same time period. I also read a report by Standard Chartered bank yesterday suggesting that Nigeria could overtake South Africa in terms of the size of the economy by 2028. I am of the view that the greatest thing working for us is our population which with globalisation makes us an indispensable market.
I also found this report on 'GOLD in Zamfara'. Yes thats right, there could be light at the end of the tunnel.

http://af.reuters.com/article/nigeriaNews/idAFLDE65722320100609?pageNumber=1&virtualBrandChannel=0

Offline bakangizo

  • Super Member
  • *****
  • Join Date: Apr 2005
  • Location: Kano
  • Posts: 1925
    • View Profile
Re: What will you change about Nigeria?
« Reply #27 on: June 10, 2010, 05:41:23 PM »
It's all good having these encouraging statistics being forecasted, but I tell you the reality is different. I'm not too sure I like teh idea of nigeria being a mere 'market' for the industrialised world. Because that is what we basically are at the moment. The Real Sector, which is the bedrock of economic growth, is comatose. So the prospect of us overtaking South Africa by 2028 in terms of size of the economy is neither here nor there. Economic size is not the same thing as quality of the economy. The real challenge is transforming Nigeria's huge population into a productive one. Not mere "recipients" of foreign products.

Offline Abu-Fatima

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Join Date: Feb 2009
  • Posts: 52
    • View Profile
Re: What will you change about Nigeria?
« Reply #28 on: June 10, 2010, 06:47:34 PM »
I think what need to be changed is our attitude to examinations in our school system, that is the basic point. Let me share with you my argument as contained in an essay I posted on Gamji.com in 2008, reproduced below:
Examination Malpractice: The Bane of the Nigerian Education System
Time and again we are told, by experts and novices alike, of the falling standard of education in Nigeria. It is not the intent of this write-up to question the basis of this supposition; rather it intends to draw attention to the cankerworm that is not only invading and eating at the very core of the Nigerian education system, but also making complete nonsense of the entire system.
All societies require education to enable new members not only fit into their work roles in the world of work, but also to satisfy the labour needs of the economy. The society look up to the school and the curriculum, as necessary to enable the rising generation gain the needed insight and power, to build a better society. In fact, the Nigerian National Policy on Education recognized education as an instrument par excellence for affecting national development.
Accountants, Architects, Bankers, Doctors, Engineers, Pharmacists, Lawyers, Journalist, Scientists, and even Teachers, are direct products of the education system. It goes without saying, that whatever compromise the efficiency and credibility of the education system compromise the quality and competency of its products.
The way and manner examinations are conducted in Nigeria today, not only rubbish the examination process but also made gibberish of the entire education system. Schools have failed in their responsibility of producing citizens that are worthy, both in character and learning; they now serve merely as gateways to meaningless certification.
Any person that has anything to do with the conduct of any form of examination in Nigeria today has a story to tell of this cankerworm that is threatening the very essence of our societal moral values. Indeed, examination malpractice has permeated all levels of the Nigerian education system. We can only afford to continue pushing this issue under the carpet at our own peril.
This problem is more alarming at the secondary schools level, for whose products external examinations and professional entry qualifications will continue to remain facts of life. Schools, on the one hand, and parents on the other, are in an unholy alliance whose only goal is to produce, by hook or crook, good examination results for the schools. Consequently, undermining the integrity of the examination bodies is fair game. This unholy alliance always finds willing foot-soldiers among the examination bodies’ staff.
How do we get into this mess? Perhaps this is the wrong question. We ought instead to be asking “Why do we get into this mess?” The answer is not far. What do you expect from a society that is all out crazy for paper qualifications? Excuse my answering the question with a question - I am just been a true-to-type Nigerian.
Examination is the thrust of the Measurement and Evaluation stage of all formal education process. Measurement in education, we were told by those who should know, is the process of determining how much knowledge and skill a student has acquired. This is usually done using tests: objective, essay etc. Evaluation on the other hand, is the process of judging the adequacy of the amount of knowledge or skill possessed by students. The measurement process ends when an examination has been administered and scored. Evaluation then passes value judgment about the scores: Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory; Distinction, Credit, Pass or Fail; Grade A, B, C, D, E or F. This is the stage in the education system that is hijacked, undermined or grossly abused by examination malpractice.
No one cares about the totality of the teaching-learning process: availability or otherwise of teaching and instructional materials; qualified and competent teachers that are masters of their subjects; conduciveness of learning environment etc. All that matters is what paper results the students graduate with. Every body wants good results, by hook or crook. Schools proprietors and managements want good examinations results, not only to show that they are working, but also to continue to attract patronage from gullible parents. Teachers want good results to justify their pay. Parents want their children to have good examinations results to be able to further their education or enter their career of choice. For the same reason, of course, students also want good examination results. So, teachers, parents and students become brother musketeers; with the schools management as their D’Artagnan - all for one and one for all – and everyone for examination malpractice.
Which way out of the woods? First, there is the need for a concrete and comprehensive social re-engineering that will salvage what remains of our societal norms and values. Second, the Examinations Malpractices Act No. 33 of 1999 which provide penalties: imprisonment, fine or both for persons and bodies found guilty of involvement in aiding, abetting, negligence or dereliction in the conduct of examinations need to be activated. Perhaps, seeing the law in action may stem the tide.
Unless the prevalence of examination malpractice is checked, Nigeria may never make it to the list of the first twenty largest economies by the year 2020. Until examination malpractice is eradicated, President ‘Yar’adua’s 7-Point Agenda will, like the US Challenger, explodes before hitting its target.
Thank you for your time.


Offline lionger

  • Super Member
  • *****
  • Join Date: Jan 2003
  • Posts: 578
    • View Profile
Re: What will you change about Nigeria?
« Reply #29 on: June 10, 2010, 07:39:47 PM »
Well said bakangizo. Producers of finished goods will always have the upper hand over mere consumers, even those who possess vital raw materials. The sooner we realize this and take the steps needed to create an industrial society the better for us.

Barring the recent recession, sub saharan economic growth in the past decade has long been reported by observers. But all is far from rosy. For one thing, economic growth is not keeping up with population growth. Moreover, we have serious issues with financial mismanagement and corruption. The end result is that though we have more and more money pouring into our economies, the overwhelming majority of our people are not seeing this money and as such are actually getting poorer. So by all means we must keep hope, but let us not lose sight of the magnamity of the task ahead of us. Development is not a given!



Aliyu,
Examination malpractise is part of the wider problem of our poor code of public ethics. I don't think our love for paper qualifications is the genesis of this particular problem though. After all, people are crazy about paper qualifications in the West as well. The difference is that the insititutions in the West are set up such that it is much harder here to obtain such things thru wayo. Also the people  in the West are far more intolerant of this kind of behaviour. I like what you say here and I think it will help propel Nigeria to the same level:

Quote
Which way out of the woods? First, there is the need for a concrete and comprehensive social re-engineering that will salvage what remains of our societal norms and values. Second, the Examinations Malpractices Act No. 33 of 1999 which provide penalties: imprisonment, fine or both for persons and bodies found guilty of involvement in aiding, abetting, negligence or dereliction in the conduct of examinations need to be activated. Perhaps, seeing the law in action may stem the tide.


 


Powered by EzPortal