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Offline _Waziri_

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The North and the Poverty Phenomenon
« on: March 12, 2007, 03:42:25 PM »
Hallo ma gud gud ppl,

Dunno if you read the following article bout poverty in Northern Nigeria. It appears to be packed up and raises important issues of concern.

Just dunno but feel like you to throw in something.

Waziri



The North and the Poverty Phenomenon

By

Salihu Moh. Lukman

slukman2003@yahoo.co.uk

 http://www.gamji.com/article6000/NEWS6707.htm

“Very high levels of poverty is essentially a Northern Phenomenon”! That was the judgement of Prof. Charles Soludo while making his presentation at the Stakeholders Meeting on the Economy on Tuesday, January 9, 2007. The three northern regions were reported to have an average poverty incidence of 70.1% as compared to 34.9% for the three southern regions. Of course, more than anything, what justifies the assertion that ‘very high levels of poverty’ is a northern phenomenon has to do with the fact that the 10 states with the highest incidence of poverty are all northern states, with Jigawa top on the list with 95%. This contrast with the fact that the 10 states with the lowest incidence of poverty are all southern states with Bayelsa reportedly having the best comparative record of 20% incidence and Edo with the highest incidence of 33.1%.

 

Interestingly, that was the very day the details of the 2006 census was released, which also showed that majority of Nigerians are in the North. So far, only the census appears to receive attention of the public. This is understandably the case because it will be the determinant for resource allocation to states and local governments from the federation account. The questions may be asked, would increased allocation to states and local governments reverse this ugly picture? In what ways have previous allocations impacted on the welfare of the people? Why is poverty ‘essentially a Northern phenomenon’ anyway? What do these poverty figures presented by Prof. Soludo really mean? Who cares if poverty is high? What is the prospect for reduced poverty in the coming years?

 

While the analysis of why poverty is ‘essentially a Northern phenomenon’ can be approached subjectively and in some respects in a biased way, it needs to be stated that although Prof. Soludo used the figures to arrive at that conclusion, it is hardly contestable. Perhaps, the fact that not any section of the public or even the media is contesting the Soludo’s figures more than a week after, demonstrates the legitimacy of these figures. Unfortunately, this legitimacy, in itself, does not necessarily translate to a commitment to fight, reverse or lower poverty in the North, or indeed in any part of the country. In any event where are all those champions of sectional interests, particularly those who clamour for the North? Are these figures not thunderous enough to warrant some attention?

 

Ordinarily, one would imagine that analysts or activists would find basis for policy contestation. May be the figures have sent shock waves and our crusaders of regional interests are yet to recover from the shock. While we await their recovery, in simple terms, Prof. Soludo’s statistical revelation means that 70% of the people living in the north live below $1 per day, which is equivalent to N129 per day. In other words, these are people who earn below N3,870 per month. This is less than the N5,500 legislated national minimum wage. Taking the 2006 census, just released, it means that 52,592,641 citizens living in the North are poor.

 

By every measure of analysis, it is very worrisome that these poverty figures are not being discussed, at least not in the media. One thing that is certain is that comparative analysis of poverty incidence tends to undermine the severity of poverty. In some instances, it also takes us farther away from the causes of poverty and how to eradicate it. In the Nigerian situation, what is also very clear is that high incidence of poverty is considerably the result of poor management of resources at all levels.

 

In analysing the incidence of poverty, particularly as it relates to the critical issue of economic activities, two submissions made by Prof. Soludo are important here. The first is that the North (excluding FCT) ‘have less bank deposit than South-South zone’ alone. Secondly, the North (again excluding FCT) accounts for approximately only 10.75% of deposits and 8.5% of bank loans. While this may not present an objective measure of the level of economic activity, it, to some degree, is indicative of the volume of formalised activities.

 

Moving away from comparative analysis, we need to focus ourselves to very specific issues. Whether Prof. Soludo, or anybody for that matter, is credited with these figures is immaterial. The challenge is that they are real and therefore what is it that can be done to release the over 52 million people living in the North out of extreme poverty trap? This will require some soul searching.

 

Looking at just the volume of resource allocation that would have come to the North from the federation account, it is disturbing that huge public funds were, and are still being, diverted away from addressing fundamental needs of the people. As a result, rather than public expenditure contributing to increasing human welfare development, it compresses the space for income earning opportunities and therefore widens the frontier of poverty.

 

Using the case of Kaduna State for instance, with incidence of something in the region of 71.1%, resource management in the last seven years is to say the least scandalous. Although allocations from the federation account have been on the increase, it clearly has not change significantly the poverty profile of the zone over the years. Poverty incidence in the region is reported to have reduced to 71.1% from the 1996 figure of 77.2%. Revenue allocation from the federation account between May 2003 and June 2006 to Kaduna State Government alone cumulatively came to N67.88 billion. The 23 local governments in the state received N60.8 billion within the period. May be this allocation is the saving grace; otherwise the incidence of poverty would be as high Jigawa, if not more. Perhaps not!

 

The Jigawa case is, for want of a better expression, quite criminal. Using the much contested 2006 census figures, with 95% incidence, it simply means that 4,131,217 out of the 4,348,649 citizens are poor (earning below N3,780 per month). In other words only 217,432 citizens in the state live above N3,780. This may as well be less than the total number of citizens in formal employment across both the public and private sectors in the state. This may tempt us to doubt whether it represent the reality.

 

Whichever way it is approached, 95% incidence is tragic and would not be without basis. Rather than giving into any form of temptation, it would be more useful to begin to investigate the cause of this nasty poverty profile and what actions are required to eradicate it. The immediate question that comes to mind here is to what extent has the much talked about Jigawa ICT project contributed to the 95% incidence? Contribution might appear indicting but how else can one ask the question?

 

Since Prof. Soludo has argued that ‘poverty is strongly correlated with level of education’, the best way to pose the question, perhaps, may be to find out from the state government the extent to which the Jigawa ICT project negatively impacted on education? I can not attempt any guess because my knowledge of Jigawa State is very limited and therefore will leave the discussion at that level and move on to Kaduna State.

 

Happily, Kaduna State is not ranked among the 10 states with highest poverty incidence. Sadly though, it is also not among the 10 states with the lowest incidence. Not even the advantage of being the seat of the first Northern regional government, which made it possible for the state to inherit some level of infrastructural development, could pull the state out of the 70% tragedy zone. Among what may be regarded as the first generation states, namely Kaduna, Oyo, Enugu and Lagos, Kaduna and Lagos did not make it in the list of the 10 states with the lowest incidence. These are states that have been seats of either regional or state governments since the colonial era.

 

Whatever may be the ranking of Kaduna State, poor management of resources is certainly a contributory factor. Taking the 7 years Progress Report of the state government as advertised in the Newswatch of October 16, 2006, titled ‘Democracy Dividends in Kaduna State’ 73% of the N59 billion capital expenditure for the period went to the construction of roads and bridges. Healthcare, water resources and education accounted for respectively 7%, 4% and 13%. We ordinarily should not quarrel with these allocations if there are no competing needs for expenditures in areas of human capital development.

 

Assuming our healthcare delivery, education, water supply, etc. are adequate and functional, high allocation to roads and bridges would be justifiable. Assuming too that this is an exaggerated way of assessing the government and evaluating its activities, what of the numerous deductions from local government allocations? The issue of management of these funds may as well be taken for granted.

 

Whatever is the attitude, the deductions, in themselves, question any claimed commitment of the state government on the issue of service delivery and welfare improvement for the people. Take the case of the so-called millennium hope project managed by the wife of the governor. In June 2006 alone, the sum of N1.05 million was deducted from the allocation of each of the 23 local governments in the state. How is this millennium hope project meeting basic needs of the citizens of the state? Why is it a priority? I am sure the state government would have every justification for this deduction at source.

 

Another worrisome deduction from the allocation of the local governments, all from the June 2006 allocations is that a total sum of N164.9 million was deducted allegedly for the rehabilitation of tractors. N19.3 million was deducted from Soba local government alone. One question that may have to be answered by the state government is how many tractors were rehabilitated and what was really the state of these tractors. Wouldn’t it have made more economic sense to use this amount to advance other agricultural needs of farmers directly?

 

The point here is; what is the opportunity cost of expending N19.3 million, in the case of Soba local government, and N164.9 million, in the case of all the 23 local governments, on the repairs of tractors? Assuming the local government voted the sum of N100,000 to each farmer towards procurement of fertiliser, improved seedlings and pesticides, with N19.3 million, 193 farmers in Soba local government alone would have benefited. For all the 23 local governments, 1,649 farmers would have benefited. It would be interesting to check how many farmers benefited from the tractor repairs project imposed on the 23 local governments by the state government. What was the expected increased farm output?

 

The June 2006 deductions are by far considerate because at least the local governments were able to have some of the allocated revenue. This is not to be the case with respect to the excess crude allocation released in October 2006 as all the allocated N1.7 billion to the 23 local governments was withheld by the state government through different forms of deductions.

 

Regarding the whole question of resource management and utilisation, take the case of the privatisation of Zarinjet, a sringe & needle manufacturing company located in Zaria which is now shut down because of dispute over privatisation process of the company between the state government and Dangote, the winning bidder. This is a case of a company that is healthy, which is about the only such company in the country with export capacity. The company has been shut down for more than 2 years now and all the workers laid off not because of any demand or supply problem.

 

Another case of misplaced priority is the huge capital expenditure that went into the setting up of the state university, which ordinarily would have been applauded. But given the poor state of education at lower levels, one wonders why the resources were not invested in primary and secondary education. This is because at the moment the state is not able to fill its quota in Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria due to low exams pass rate. This could only be justifiable if the objective of setting up a state university is to bring down entry requirement below the national standard so as to ensure that even students that have not pass SSCE could gain admission. It may be of interest to know how many per cent of the state university admissions come from the state. Given the current exam pass rate, it may not account for more 30%, except if the admission requirement is lowered. Even then, majority may have to be admitted to read religious studies, languages and arts.

 

In relation to education, there are very interesting cases of local governments taking away spaces reserved for games in primary schools to build shops. Two shop complexes are near completion in Zaria as a result of such crazy decision. These are located in Baban Dodo, Zaria city and Kofan Doka. In the case of Kofan Doka primary school, apart from taking away part of the school and constructing a shop complex, there is an interesting notice on the wall of one of the classroom blocks to the effect that ‘do not play football in this school, it is highly prohibited’. This is said to be police order!

 

The only consolation is that the primary school host daily football practices, competition, etc. This notwithstanding, the mere fact that such a notice could be inscribed with paint by whoever on the wall of one of the classroom blocks, and allowed to stay by the management of the school to some extent is suggestive of some violation of basic school requirement, which ordinarily could undermine the development of children.

 

There is the interesting scenario of dualising Zaria city road when the city has been without water all these years. In fact, the Zaria water project, valued at over N1 billion, awarded more than six years ago is yet to provide water to the people. The reality is that the project is a stop-gap measure as a lasting solution would require expansion work on Zaria dam, which is estimated to cost about N6 billion. In the circumstance, why shouldn’t the government prioritise the expansion work on the Zaria dam?

 

Talking of construction work, there is also the interesting decision of the state government to expend N981.7 million for the construction of Makarfi City Layout Bridge. This is a city that has no river, lake or any form of water flow passing across the city. For the purpose of analysis, let us even concede to the state government that there is a need for such a bridge, does the traffic flow in Makarfi City demand this huge public investment on a bridge? If so, what is the expected return on this public investment?

 

My suspicion is that the only justification would be that this is the home state of Governor Ahmed Mohammed Makarfi. Should this be the case, are there no better ways of rewarding the diligent people of this promising city? For instance, wouldn’t it have been more rewarding if the whole N981.7 million is used for skills development, which could have had with it some credit incentives by way of provision of tools and equipments. This would have certainly gone a long way to provide direct economic assistance to citizens and many citizens of Makarfi would have been gainfully employed earning beyond N3,870 per month and therefore bring down the poverty level both in the city, the state and the north.

 

We can go on and on with the analysis. The objective is basically to focus attention to issues of poor resource management and how that could have reduced the North to poverty trapped zone. It is no use lamenting this reality. A related sad issue is also the fact that there is the entrenchment of values which is accelerating the process of deskilling many young people in the zone. This has to do with the attitude towards ‘get-rich-quick’ that made majority of young educated people to become speculators of all sorts – from hawking government LPO, to currency trafficking and to all sorts of petty trading. All categories of people, from university, polytechnics and higher education graduates to school drop outs, from skilled to unskilled individuals. It is like a general assembly whose meeting points are always the corridors of government ministries (from local to states and federal). In some cases they serve as fronts for public officials. Much clamour for support to north hardly go beyond allocation of government jobs and contracts to these categories of people, which is always inflated.

 

The fundamental issue is; are we likely to witness any changes, which could impact positively on the welfare of the people of the North and perhaps bring down the poverty levels in the zone? It is most unlikely. This is because for any change to happen there has to be some indication of commitment to effect it. Again using Kaduna State as a reference point, there is nothing to suggest the existence of a programmatic approach to institute any form of action to eradicate poverty.

 

It is my hope that I am wrong in this assessment. If however, this assessment is right, nobody should shed any crocodile tears. What is required is organisation and taking proactive steps to engage our government and block all the wastes in public resource management. This is not impossible. Looking back into the history of the North, it is blessed with experiences and traditions that could confer capacity to pull the people and the zone out of poverty. The success story of Northern Element Progressive Union (NEPU), the Borno Youth Movement (BYM) and United Middle Belt Congress (UMBC), etc. are there to inspire us.

 

« Last Edit: March 12, 2007, 03:45:27 PM by _Waziri_ »

Offline neozizo

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Re: The North and the Poverty Phenomenon
« Reply #1 on: March 17, 2007, 04:09:24 PM »
Lack of focus, misplaced priorities, incompetence, misappropriation f resources and deficiency of sound moral character on the part of our leaders are some of the causes of the state of the northern states.


The entrepreneurial class lacks the needed innovativeness, sophistication and originality needed in today’s business world. 

The general northern populace on its part seems to lack the knowledge of its appalling situation and also lacks desire and self-motivation to change for the better.
With general elections few days away, it is glaringly evident that the crop of candidates vying for various posts lack the kind of dynamism and purpose needed to tackle the general state of backwardness in the north.

I’m afraid I will only have to agree with Lukman that a long or short term solution is not any where near the sights of anybody hoping for such

On Soludo's statistics...
Although more light has to be shed on the methodology and parameters used in arriving at them, we can safely agree that the reality will not be much different from what the Prof posits.
I’m really surprised that Lagos Stat is not listed among the 10 states with least incidence of poverty…..(Isn’t it ironical that some states are contesting the latest census results, clamoring for higher figures for their states-keeping in mind the direct co-relation of over population and poverty!)

His claim of the entire north(apart fro Abuja) having less bank activity than the ‘south-south zone alone’ is of particular intrest and concern to me..
As I have insisted elsewhere in this forum, the current banking reforms induced consolidation of the Prof can only deepen the dire state of the north economically
A perusal of the list of CEOs and MDs of the existing banks reveals a dearth of northerners.My argument is that the north at this point in time needs ‘socialist’ thinking (and patrotic) economic institution to help it climb out of poverty as opposed to the capitalist system we have today
Plus I believe when change comes, if it comes, it will definitely be private sector driven in keeping with current world trends.
Governments have failed us and will continue to do so in the North,the days of the Sardauna’s,Balewas,NEPU’s are gone for good.
Arewa..sai gyaran Allah

Offline _Waziri_

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Re: The North and the Poverty Phenomenon
« Reply #2 on: March 23, 2007, 02:02:12 PM »
Lack of focus, misplaced priorities, incompetence, misappropriation f resources and deficiency of sound moral character on the part of our leaders are some of the causes of the state of the northern states.


The entrepreneurial class lacks the needed innovativeness, sophistication and originality needed in today’s business world. 

The general northern populace on its part seems to lack the knowledge of its appalling situation and also lacks desire and self-motivation to change for the better.....
Arewa..sai gyaran Allah


I was wondering the other day when I saw one man I used to know about 20 years ago in his little cave in our neighbourhood where he used to roast and still roasts meet for sell. Nothing changed about him, the business or even the hole he does the business in. Don't mention the packaging of the product. Seriously, state of things in the North worries me to tears and to feelings too deep for tears. And the population headcount has recorded over 76 million population for the North on an annual growth of 3.5% for the country, which makes our population to reach about 120 million in 10 years to come. This greets our expectations with more poverty, ethno-religious riots, and other lands, farms and spaces conflicts.

Offline Nuruddeen

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Re: The North and the Poverty Phenomenon
« Reply #3 on: July 02, 2007, 06:58:45 PM »
I was wondering the other day when I saw one man I used to know about 20 years ago in his little cave in our neighbourhood where he used to roast and still roasts meet for sell. Nothing changed about him, the business or even the hole he does the business in. Don't mention the packaging of the product. Seriously, state of things in the North worries me to tears and to feelings too deep for tears. And the population headcount has recorded over 76 million population for the North on an annual growth of 3.5% for the country, which makes our population to reach about 120 million in 10 years to come. This greets our expectations with more poverty, ethno-religious riots, and other lands, farms and spaces conflicts.
[/quote]

Mr Waziri, you really raised some vital issues affecting northern Nigeria. But in my view, I think poverty will continue to be an issue provided our leaders will develop a thick skin on their people's affairs. Everything is tied down to bad leadership and misrepresentation. I commisserate with you particularly on your concern about the lackadaical nature of our stakeholders. They dont care about what happens to north provided their children and relatives are protected. May Allah exenorate north from its present status.
o try and fail is atleast to learn. That will save one the inestimable loss of what might have been (positive or negative).

Offline _Waziri_

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Re: The North and the Poverty Phenomenon
« Reply #4 on: July 10, 2007, 11:32:55 AM »
My major problem, Nuruddeen, even is the amount of magic that can be deployed by even a serious goverment to save the north in the years to come. Development must have a pace and in our case it doesn't even have a face!

Offline amira

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Re: The North and the Poverty Phenomenon
« Reply #5 on: November 25, 2007, 12:46:11 AM »
I Mr Waziri, you really raised some vital issues affecting northern Nigeria. But in my view, I think poverty will continue to be an issue provided our leaders will develop a thick skin on their people's affairs. Everything is tied down to bad leadership and misrepresentation. I commisserate with you particularly on your concern about the lackadaical nature of our stakeholders. They dont care about what happens to north provided their children and relatives are protected. May Allah exenorate north from its present status.

Spot on Nuruddeen, kana da gaskiya as long as nasu are fine, thats it no concern for others and definately the leadership that also plays a major role.
Allah dai shi taimaka ameen.
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Offline Dan-Borno

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Re: The North and the Poverty Phenomenon
« Reply #6 on: December 10, 2007, 11:54:17 PM »
On several visit to this forum, i   kept on going through
this thread again and again, whenever i tried making a
post, i see no reason, for a lot have been said in the
thread.

We are supposed, in this forum to pay attention more
on this thread, as it has directly affected us and our
unborn children.

When you critically look into Soludo's assertions and take
a look at your community as Waziri portraid of someone
he knew donkey years, you will definitely come to the
conclusion that what the prof said needs no negative
but positive approval.

The politicians have been betraying us, while those learned
among us also joined the politicians in destorying the north.
Our business gurus and religious leaders were neither left
aside, all have dangerously steer the wheels of the arewa
into the present phenomenon.

That N3,000 minimum will sound crazy to so many readers,
but wallahi when you look at the society critically, you will
come to the conclusion that YES we live in abject poverty.

Dan-Borno's usual prayers sustained.

"My mama always used to tell me: 'If you can't find somethin' to live for, you best find somethin' to die for" - Tupak

Offline alhaji_aminu

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Re: The North and the Poverty Phenomenon
« Reply #7 on: December 12, 2007, 12:24:05 AM »
Salam

The problems we have are enormous but not unsurmountable. It is instructive to note that in the 60s the level of ppl leaving below the poverty line was put around 30%. The story is totally different today. Govt after govt come and promise to alleviate poverty for the worst off but nothing come out of it. One may ask, how did we degenerate to this? Did I hear anyone say O-I-L?

The oft repeated cliche about going back to farm is actually the solution. For a country that imports 4 mil Metric tons of wheat, 1.3 mil Metric tons of Sugar and 1mil metric tons of Rice annually, it isn't hard to see where govt can focus its attention and provide opportunity to farmers.  Imagine if farmers were enlightened about these shortfalls in demand and imagine if they can fill the void?

The soaring cost of sesame, soya bean, cashew nuts, gum arabic etc all point to the enormous potentials in the sectors. Lets not forget the poultry and fisheries- there too, Nigeria is a net importer. Indeed if Nigeria can replace all the food it imports by local production, around $7 bil will be realised by Nigerian farmers- most of whom reside in the North.

Any serious govt trying to help ppl escape poverty must devote alot of attention to the agricultural situation.................. But they never listen, do they?

Offline ummita

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Re: The North and the Poverty Phenomenon
« Reply #8 on: December 16, 2007, 06:21:39 PM »
On several visit to this forum, i   kept on going through
this thread again and again, whenever i tried making a
post, i see no reason, for a lot have been said in the
True, true, true. Every time I read through am always amazed by the amount of intelligent heads in here. Allah bamu brains irin naku.

The politicians have been betraying us, while those learned
among us also joined the politicians in destorying the north.
Our business gurus and religious leaders were neither left
aside, all have dangerously steer the wheels of the arewa
into the present phenomenon.
You again, Uncle Dan-Maiduguri!! You are correct. However, some of us wear our tinted shades and turn a blind eye on our own little mistakes. Lets reflect a little. During Abacha’s regime, we howled over his dictatorship. Baba followed suit, we moaned, protested and criticized - even though their notorious slipup’s were true. Now under Yar’adua’s supremacy, some us have already started expressing their grief over his lack of skill and expertise. Am just trying to bring close to nose, our own share of tiny negligent mistakes for sniff. If people didn’t covet them in the first place they wouldn’t come to power. We voted and benched them. And if they called the wrong number, why do we answer the phone? And only when it is a too late we stand to complain and eventually blame in on renowned ballot voting delinquency. An infinitesimal number of airheads calling their selves our political figures or leaders cannot pull off the ropes if held by a billion Nigerians. We know they are in office because they give us that impression but being in absolute power, I think not! And the sooner we begin to have these Eureka’s the better.  Because no bad government can secure positions long enough with oppositions from the members of public.  Am sorry to say this but we are part of the problem. Only after we begin to realize how we can overpower the powerful our rights to good living conditions will keep being suppressed by our very own imperial managers whose bodies have been invaded and possessed by greed and selfishness.

The North and the Poverty Phenomenon
BySalihu Moh. Lukman slukman2003@yahoo.co.uk  http://www.gamji.com/article6000/NEWS6707.htm
Why is poverty ‘essentially a Northern phenomenon’ anyway?
No, no, no and no. Poverty is a global dilemma!!!!! It is not just restricted in the North but all over the world!!!! Even the rich European nations whose wealth acquisition is partly due to their good industrialization, the disparities are becoming evidently sharp because they are also witnessing a volume of poverty because consumption is becoming stark. Less of their people are turning out to be benefiting while an increasing number are left behind. Like we are not meant to understand the concept behind free movement of goods. *Signs* am always saying this, in Africa, Nigeria is not suffering from poverty because an average joe can buy something to eat drink and find a place to squat whilst this is not so in places like Sudan! The phenomenon we are facing is political crisis, which is having an adverse effect because of the misuse of our resources. In Sudan, Dafur, Somalia, India even some part of ghetto USA, France UK and Germany have their own little percentage of inhabitants suffering from poverty! It is global!!! So in Nigeria it is all over, not only the north. Im not even going to sit and pieces out that statistical findings.

The North and the Poverty Phenomenon
BySalihu Moh. Lukman slukman2003@yahoo.co.uk  http://www.gamji.com/article6000/NEWS6707.htm
Assuming our healthcare delivery, education, water supply, etc. are adequate and functional, high allocation to roads and bridges would be justifiable. Assuming too that this is an exaggerated way of assessing the government and evaluating its activities, what of the numerous deductions from local government allocations? The issue of management of these funds may as well be taken for granted.
This is far from assuming. Frankly speaking the implementation of governmental strategies for the upkeep of the general public in Nigeria as a whole are quite appalling. Like a lot of you pointed on the causes of poverty, I do not think it is only consequential to poor education, poor environmental performances, or the embezzlement of funds and resources. The family tree of poverty is incomplete without having regards to other important factors. 

What about past issues such as third world debt - because of our government’s unwillingness to admit they have made bad loans in the past which might have been dealt with ages ago it has thus permitted terrible living conditions to be visited upon vulnerable members of the society due to lack of funds.

What about issues of free trade? Neoliberalism being the mechanism for global trade and investment supposedly meant to be for the prosperity of the nation and individuals but seemingly, the only people benefiting are business tycoons and the rich and mighty.

Ok, what about sustainable development, which goes to the heart of tackling a number of inter-related issues of poverty - such as inequality, hunger and environmental degradation. We all know that sustainability means several different things to different people, so how comes a great fraction of humanity still live without access to basic necessities? Causes of poverty are inter-related between environment and economy and approach must be made to the two main angles if there is to be a shift away from poverty.


Any serious govt trying to help ppl escape poverty must devote alot of attention to the agricultural situation.................. But they never listen, do they?
But then, agricultural production and consumption is also undermining the farming resource bases itself. You might notice the lack of redistributing from high-income consumers to low-income producers, not shifting from polluted and non edible goods to cleaner produce, poor production technologies, not promoting goods that empowers existing poor farmers, not promoting the movement and trade of national harvest, not shifting priority from consumption for conspicuous display to meeting basic needs is all a great whiplash and if not taken care of, will only worsen the problem of human development.
 

« Last Edit: December 16, 2007, 07:38:44 PM by ummita »
Despite ur slammin, am still jammin!!!

Offline ummita

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Re: The North and the Poverty Phenomenon
« Reply #9 on: December 16, 2007, 07:43:49 PM »
I was wondering the other day when I saw one man I used to know about 20 years ago in his little cave in our neighbourhood where he used to roast and still roasts meet for sell. Nothing changed about him, the business or even the hole he does the business in. Don't mention the packaging of the product. Seriously, state of things in the North worries me to tears and to feelings too deep for tears.
And lastly….. We all empathize when one is in difficulty but the butchers circumstances does not justify that poverty is the sole cause of his unsuccessful business situation perhaps a part of it otherwise, it’s just like me failing ten job interviews and saying “God! Poverty ehn!” when all I needed doing was preparing for it! We all try to make ends meet by holding different job positions for the simple reasons of evading poverty and/or poor living conditions. Therefore, the butcher is just another statistical figure doing his part. He is not in a very bad situation. I think he just needs to replenish his business skills, a new business plan - new marketing and promotional strategies or swap to a new trade and I pray that things work out for him :-X


« Last Edit: December 16, 2007, 07:51:25 PM by ummita »
Despite ur slammin, am still jammin!!!

Offline Nuruddeen

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Re: The North and the Poverty Phenomenon
« Reply #10 on: December 16, 2007, 09:11:27 PM »
I was wondering the other day when I saw one man I used to know about 20 years ago in his little cave in our neighbourhood where he used to roast and still roasts meet for sell. Nothing changed about him, the business or even the hole he does the business in. Don't mention the packaging of the product. Seriously, state of things in the North worries me to tears and to feelings too deep for tears.
And lastly….. We all empathize when one is in difficulty but the butchers circumstances does not justify that poverty is the sole cause of his unsuccessful business situation perhaps a part of it otherwise, it’s just like me failing ten job interviews and saying “God! Poverty ehn!” when all I needed doing was preparing for it! We all try to make ends meet by holding different job positions for the simple reasons of evading poverty and/or poor living conditions. Therefore, the butcher is just another statistical figure doing his part. He is not in a very bad situation. I think he just needs to replenish his business skills, a new business plan - new marketing and promotional strategies or swap to a new trade and I pray that things work out for him :-X




Su Ummita Manya. All ur points noted but what d u think is the real solution?
o try and fail is atleast to learn. That will save one the inestimable loss of what might have been (positive or negative).

Offline Ishaq

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Re: The North and the Poverty Phenomenon
« Reply #11 on: December 30, 2007, 01:56:00 PM »
The problem of the north is not only poverty,you have include other issues such as high level of illetracy in the north because i believe whenever there is illetracy you will surely find poverty in that enviroment. These two phenomenas go hand in hand with each other,in other to curb poverty in north a good and qualitative education most be provided to the northerns and these is a collective responsibilty for both the govt and the people.

Offline Dan-Borno

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Re: The North and the Poverty Phenomenon
« Reply #12 on: December 30, 2007, 02:55:27 PM »
Ishaq you are welcome to kanoonline forum and its seems
your choice of start-off on poverty in the north shows how
concern you are to the phenomenon.

If i may throw a little question to you.  Can you please let
us know what you meant by HIGH LEVEL OF ILLITERACY in
with regards to the north?
"My mama always used to tell me: 'If you can't find somethin' to live for, you best find somethin' to die for" - Tupak

Offline Dave_McEwan_Hill

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Re: The North and the Poverty Phenomenon
« Reply #13 on: December 30, 2007, 05:46:11 PM »
I came to Kano to assist as a teacher trainer in the UPE (Universal Primary Education) programme in the 1970s. Huge strides were made over those years to get a large majority of Northern children (particularly girls) into schools and literacy. I hope these advances have not been lost.
maigemu

Offline Ibro2g

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Re: The North and the Poverty Phenomenon
« Reply #14 on: January 15, 2008, 12:58:26 AM »
This is very Sad

With all due respect, we are poor, we are illiterates and we have bad managements. We take all this and put on the government. Why? surely they have thier faultys but why just them. I'll tell you why, because the Northern Nigerian man is lazy thats why. Most people in the north rely on government work (even that is not done efficiently), they dont cultivate businesses or seek developements. Others dont even work at all. They rather beg on the streets or goto other men, heap praises and beg in a bigger way.

Honestly, foreign civilisation came to the northern nigeria first, we were introduced to education, commerce and a religion that provides a decent way of life. But Sloth is the sin that has brought us to where we are today. Vanity is the second. My people are too proud and feel to big to for investments, in ignorance they feel sustainace will deliver them from thier miserable mistakes.

Employment in the southern states are higher than in norther states, not only because the governments have more jobs, but because the people create jobs for themselves. Some even loan money to establish businesses and work themselves off to make it work, God willing it grows. And they grow along with it. Its never been in our nature to make investments. The best businessman in Hausaland is usually a marchant.

If we want poverty to change in Nigeria even as a whole we need to change ourselves first. We need to start taking chances at the opprtunities life has offered. There are so many small scale busineses that are available and for the opportuned, there are alot of ways you can invest which will both develope the society and make you rich. Its high time some responsibilities are lifted off the government since it has evidently shown it cant handle them.

For instance, The Nigerian railway has been dormant for as long as I have lived. How long until someone get a license and lay some rails. It'll bring in good money, long time investment and improve the country's employment and social level. I'm sure many people on here know at least 10 northerners each who have the financial ability and stability to carry out such projects, but nada. They rather someone come in and say ranka ya dadde and they throw N5000 so he may return tomoro.

Alot need be changed about our personal lives and ways of thinking before poverty can start reducing in this country. Most rich people in Nigeria got it kissing government a** or money laundring(too common even). They save themoney in banks and forget about them. If they had invested in social developement, at least we woulda gotten something. But its like money keeps disappearing from this country and cars and swiming pools keep appearing.

By God if we dont take matters in our own hands, come another century, They might not be an Arewa to call home, we just might end up being the next worst place on earth, after Darfur, Sudan. The once fertile lands eating by the neglected desertification, the people hungry and oppressed, eaten by sloth and greed, the buildings ruptured from neglect and conservasion of nothing, and the government...if it may last will still be sucking out money like leeches into foreign governments. Nothing us.

 Lets help ourselves so Allah may help us...


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